Login | Register For Free | Help
Search for: (Advanced)

Mailing List Archive: VNC: list

Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine?

 

 

VNC list RSS feed   Index | Next | Previous | View Threaded


Philip at Herlihy

Jun 20, 2009, 6:10 AM

Post #1 of 7 (2944 views)
Permalink
Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine?

On XP machines I've set up a script which invokes a connection to a
listening client:

>vinvnc4.ext - connect MyClientHost.MyDomain.com

- very useful. This doesn't work on Vista. Can anyone advise on how I'd do
the equivalent from a command-line or command-file? The Vista box has VNC
running as a service.

Phil, London

_______________________________________________
VNC-List mailing list
VNC-List [at] realvnc
To remove yourself from the list visit:
http://www.realvnc.com/mailman/listinfo/vnc-list


eshelmand at gmail

Jun 20, 2009, 10:10 PM

Post #2 of 7 (2745 views)
Permalink
Re: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine? [In reply to]

I would be interested to know how to create a script in WXP Pro as I
have never done it.
Can you provide more information on how to create a script to use and
how then to use the script?

On Jun 20, 2009, at 8:10 AM, Philip Herlihy wrote:

> On XP machines I've set up a script which invokes a connection to a
> listening client:
>
>> vinvnc4.ext - connect MyClientHost.MyDomain.com
>
> - very useful. This doesn't work on Vista. Can anyone advise on
> how I'd do
> the equivalent from a command-line or command-file? The Vista box
> has VNC
> running as a service.
>
> Phil, London
>
> _______________________________________________
> VNC-List mailing list
> VNC-List [at] realvnc
> To remove yourself from the list visit:
> http://www.realvnc.com/mailman/listinfo/vnc-list


Dale Eshelman
eshelmand [at] gmail

ShopToEarn (Dist ID 105985)
http://www.ShopToEarn.net/DaleEshelman

MonaVie (Distr ID 1316953)
http://www.monavie.com/Web/US/en/product_overview.dhtml

The closer I get to the pain of glass in Windoz, the farther I can see
and I see a Mac on the horizon.

_______________________________________________
VNC-List mailing list
VNC-List [at] realvnc
To remove yourself from the list visit:
http://www.realvnc.com/mailman/listinfo/vnc-list


Philip at Herlihy

Jul 5, 2009, 8:31 AM

Post #3 of 7 (2641 views)
Permalink
RE: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine? [now SCRIPTS] [In reply to]

Sorry it's taken so long to respond - inundated with email lately!

From the way you frame your question it sounds as if scripting would be a
new avenue for you. I'll give a brief summary here (for fear of
exasperating experienced scripters). If you want more information, contact
me direct.

"Scripting" simply means storing a series of commands in a file and then
running the file in one go. It's a close cousin to "programming" - loosely,
programs are normally converted into a binary program by a "compiler", while
scripts are usually "interpreted" line by line by some other running
program.

There are several "interpreters" available for Windows NT and its
descendents. If you click Start, Run, then type CMD and click OK you'll get
the familiar DOS-like command interpreter. With a few adjustments, anything
you type in there can be stored in a script and run. If you put the
following lines in a text file:

DIR
PAUSE

.. and save that as mytest.cmd (not mytest.txt) you can double-click it and
you'll see the black window appear with the output of the DIR command (which
lists files) and a line inviting you to press any key to continue (at which
point the screen disappears, which is why many of my scripts end with
PAUSE!). If you Google for "NT Command Line" or "NT Command Scripting"
you'll find loads of resources, and I rather like the book on NT Shell
Scripting by Tim Hill (Macmillan 1998). I tend to use plain NT scripting
for simple scripts.

Other "interpreters" include "Windows Scripting Host" (usually already
installed as part of Windows) which can interpret Visual Basic Script (VBS)
commands, which are much more powerful than the rather creaky NT
command-line interface. I tend to use VBS for more complex scripts, as the
error-handling in NT scripting is rudimentary. VBS can also interact with
Excel and other Office programs in a sophisticated way.

More recently another interpreter has become available, and this promises
something like the (awesome and underused) power of Unix scripting:
PowerShell. Non-trivial, but immensely powerful. Some of Microsoft's
flagship server products are expected to be administered mainly by
Powershell scripting in their most recent versions. I got through two
chapters of the book (still next to my workstation) before other work blew
that away...

How does this affect RealVNC users? Well, I provide the people I support
with a simple script which they click to connect to my "listening client".
I've set up port-forwarding at my end to allow port 5500 through to my
preferred machine, and all Uncle Joe has to do to get my help is
double-click the script's icon on their desktop. The advantage of this
arrangement is that I can deal with firewall problems at my end without
having to get them to fiddle with such mysteries at their end - it just
works. I think it would also be possible to create a script which would
check regularly for a working connection and reconnect if none existed, but
that's for another day/month/year.

In the past (XP and earlier) I've used a script which pops up an explanatory
message box first (giving the option to cancel in case of a finger-fumble),
then checks for a running server and then connects to my hard-coded address.
I'll be happy to send you (or anyone else interested) a copy of this on
request. The essential line is:

WinVNC4.exe -connect <phils-domain-address>

.. where phils-domain-address is a domain name provided by my ISP, although
an IP address will do. If you have a dynamic IP address, you can use
DynDNS.com (free) to set up a domain name which will track your changing IP
address (assuming you run the update client on at least one running
machine).

My original question was about Vista. I've found that including the term
"-service" in the line above allows the connection to work (in the
configurations I've set up), but I need to modify my script to check whether
a server is running as a service or in user-mode, or not at all.
Nevertheless, if you get the person needing support to check manually if the
server is running (task manager or spot the icon) then that one line may be
all you need in a simple script. Lord knows when I'll get round to doing
the modification to my script, but I doubt it'll turn out to be any more
difficult than what worked well for XP.

I must say that the documentation for Command Line use of RealVNC is rather
inadequate (or is it just hard-to-find?).

Hope that's useful.


Philip Herlihy, London



-----Original Message-----
From: vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc [mailto:vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc] On
Behalf Of Dale Eshelman
Sent: 21 June 2009 06:11
To: Philip Herlihy
Cc: vnc-list [at] realvnc
Subject: Re: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine?

I would be interested to know how to create a script in WXP Pro as I
have never done it.
Can you provide more information on how to create a script to use and
how then to use the script?

On Jun 20, 2009, at 8:10 AM, Philip Herlihy wrote:

> On XP machines I've set up a script which invokes a connection to a
> listening client:
>
>> vinvnc4.ext - connect MyClientHost.MyDomain.com
>
> - very useful. This doesn't work on Vista. Can anyone advise on
> how I'd do
> the equivalent from a command-line or command-file? The Vista box
> has VNC
> running as a service.
>
> Phil, London
>


_______________________________________________
VNC-List mailing list
VNC-List [at] realvnc
To remove yourself from the list visit:
http://www.realvnc.com/mailman/listinfo/vnc-list


sbostedor at vncscan

Jul 5, 2009, 10:07 AM

Post #4 of 7 (2631 views)
Permalink
RE: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine? [now SCRIPTS] [In reply to]

Hello,

It sounds like you're looking for the remote scripting features found in
the VNCScan Enterprise Network Manager (www.vncscan.com). It is a VNC
manager that also allows you to run scripts on the remote computers.

Thanks!

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc [mailto:vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc] On
Behalf Of Philip Herlihy
Sent: Sunday, July 05, 2009 11:31 AM
To: 'Dale Eshelman'
Cc: vnc-list [at] realvnc
Subject: RE: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine?
[now SCRIPTS]

Sorry it's taken so long to respond - inundated with email lately!

From the way you frame your question it sounds as if scripting would be a
new avenue for you. I'll give a brief summary here (for fear of
exasperating experienced scripters). If you want more information, contact
me direct.

"Scripting" simply means storing a series of commands in a file and then
running the file in one go. It's a close cousin to "programming" - loosely,
programs are normally converted into a binary program by a "compiler", while
scripts are usually "interpreted" line by line by some other running
program.

There are several "interpreters" available for Windows NT and its
descendents. If you click Start, Run, then type CMD and click OK you'll get
the familiar DOS-like command interpreter. With a few adjustments, anything
you type in there can be stored in a script and run. If you put the
following lines in a text file:

DIR
PAUSE

.. and save that as mytest.cmd (not mytest.txt) you can double-click it and
you'll see the black window appear with the output of the DIR command (which
lists files) and a line inviting you to press any key to continue (at which
point the screen disappears, which is why many of my scripts end with
PAUSE!). If you Google for "NT Command Line" or "NT Command Scripting"
you'll find loads of resources, and I rather like the book on NT Shell
Scripting by Tim Hill (Macmillan 1998). I tend to use plain NT scripting
for simple scripts.

Other "interpreters" include "Windows Scripting Host" (usually already
installed as part of Windows) which can interpret Visual Basic Script (VBS)
commands, which are much more powerful than the rather creaky NT
command-line interface. I tend to use VBS for more complex scripts, as the
error-handling in NT scripting is rudimentary. VBS can also interact with
Excel and other Office programs in a sophisticated way.

More recently another interpreter has become available, and this promises
something like the (awesome and underused) power of Unix scripting:
PowerShell. Non-trivial, but immensely powerful. Some of Microsoft's
flagship server products are expected to be administered mainly by
Powershell scripting in their most recent versions. I got through two
chapters of the book (still next to my workstation) before other work blew
that away...

How does this affect RealVNC users? Well, I provide the people I support
with a simple script which they click to connect to my "listening client".
I've set up port-forwarding at my end to allow port 5500 through to my
preferred machine, and all Uncle Joe has to do to get my help is
double-click the script's icon on their desktop. The advantage of this
arrangement is that I can deal with firewall problems at my end without
having to get them to fiddle with such mysteries at their end - it just
works. I think it would also be possible to create a script which would
check regularly for a working connection and reconnect if none existed, but
that's for another day/month/year.

In the past (XP and earlier) I've used a script which pops up an explanatory
message box first (giving the option to cancel in case of a finger-fumble),
then checks for a running server and then connects to my hard-coded address.
I'll be happy to send you (or anyone else interested) a copy of this on
request. The essential line is:

WinVNC4.exe -connect <phils-domain-address>

.. where phils-domain-address is a domain name provided by my ISP, although
an IP address will do. If you have a dynamic IP address, you can use
DynDNS.com (free) to set up a domain name which will track your changing IP
address (assuming you run the update client on at least one running
machine).

My original question was about Vista. I've found that including the term
"-service" in the line above allows the connection to work (in the
configurations I've set up), but I need to modify my script to check whether
a server is running as a service or in user-mode, or not at all.
Nevertheless, if you get the person needing support to check manually if the
server is running (task manager or spot the icon) then that one line may be
all you need in a simple script. Lord knows when I'll get round to doing
the modification to my script, but I doubt it'll turn out to be any more
difficult than what worked well for XP.

I must say that the documentation for Command Line use of RealVNC is rather
inadequate (or is it just hard-to-find?).

Hope that's useful.


Philip Herlihy, London



-----Original Message-----
From: vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc [mailto:vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc] On
Behalf Of Dale Eshelman
Sent: 21 June 2009 06:11
To: Philip Herlihy
Cc: vnc-list [at] realvnc
Subject: Re: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine?

I would be interested to know how to create a script in WXP Pro as I
have never done it.
Can you provide more information on how to create a script to use and
how then to use the script?

On Jun 20, 2009, at 8:10 AM, Philip Herlihy wrote:

> On XP machines I've set up a script which invokes a connection to a
> listening client:
>
>> vinvnc4.ext - connect MyClientHost.MyDomain.com
>
> - very useful. This doesn't work on Vista. Can anyone advise on
> how I'd do
> the equivalent from a command-line or command-file? The Vista box
> has VNC
> running as a service.
>
> Phil, London
>


_______________________________________________
VNC-List mailing list
VNC-List [at] realvnc
To remove yourself from the list visit:
http://www.realvnc.com/mailman/listinfo/vnc-list


_______________________________________________
VNC-List mailing list
VNC-List [at] realvnc
To remove yourself from the list visit:
http://www.realvnc.com/mailman/listinfo/vnc-list


eshelmand at gmail

Jul 5, 2009, 9:44 PM

Post #5 of 7 (2639 views)
Permalink
Re: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine? [now SCRIPTS] [In reply to]

Nope - I am not looking for that. I am looking for the Windows
scripting utility and how to utilize it with VNC Free Edition.

All these years and I did not know and have heard no discussions on
Windows scripting utility, how it works and the commnad language.

Dale

On Jul 5, 2009, at 12:07 PM, Steve Bostedor wrote:

> Hello,
>
> It sounds like you're looking for the remote scripting features
> found in
> the VNCScan Enterprise Network Manager (www.vncscan.com). It is a VNC
> manager that also allows you to run scripts on the remote computers.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Steve
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc [mailto:vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc
> ] On
> Behalf Of Philip Herlihy
> Sent: Sunday, July 05, 2009 11:31 AM
> To: 'Dale Eshelman'
> Cc: vnc-list [at] realvnc
> Subject: RE: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista
> machine?
> [now SCRIPTS]
>
> Sorry it's taken so long to respond - inundated with email lately!
>
> From the way you frame your question it sounds as if scripting would
> be a
> new avenue for you. I'll give a brief summary here (for fear of
> exasperating experienced scripters). If you want more information,
> contact
> me direct.
>
> "Scripting" simply means storing a series of commands in a file and
> then
> running the file in one go. It's a close cousin to "programming" -
> loosely,
> programs are normally converted into a binary program by a
> "compiler", while
> scripts are usually "interpreted" line by line by some other running
> program.
>
> There are several "interpreters" available for Windows NT and its
> descendents. If you click Start, Run, then type CMD and click OK
> you'll get
> the familiar DOS-like command interpreter. With a few adjustments,
> anything
> you type in there can be stored in a script and run. If you put the
> following lines in a text file:
>
> DIR
> PAUSE
>
> .. and save that as mytest.cmd (not mytest.txt) you can double-click
> it and
> you'll see the black window appear with the output of the DIR
> command (which
> lists files) and a line inviting you to press any key to continue
> (at which
> point the screen disappears, which is why many of my scripts end with
> PAUSE!). If you Google for "NT Command Line" or "NT Command
> Scripting"
> you'll find loads of resources, and I rather like the book on NT Shell
> Scripting by Tim Hill (Macmillan 1998). I tend to use plain NT
> scripting
> for simple scripts.
>
> Other "interpreters" include "Windows Scripting Host" (usually already
> installed as part of Windows) which can interpret Visual Basic
> Script (VBS)
> commands, which are much more powerful than the rather creaky NT
> command-line interface. I tend to use VBS for more complex scripts,
> as the
> error-handling in NT scripting is rudimentary. VBS can also
> interact with
> Excel and other Office programs in a sophisticated way.
>
> More recently another interpreter has become available, and this
> promises
> something like the (awesome and underused) power of Unix scripting:
> PowerShell. Non-trivial, but immensely powerful. Some of Microsoft's
> flagship server products are expected to be administered mainly by
> Powershell scripting in their most recent versions. I got through two
> chapters of the book (still next to my workstation) before other
> work blew
> that away...
>
> How does this affect RealVNC users? Well, I provide the people I
> support
> with a simple script which they click to connect to my "listening
> client".
> I've set up port-forwarding at my end to allow port 5500 through to my
> preferred machine, and all Uncle Joe has to do to get my help is
> double-click the script's icon on their desktop. The advantage of
> this
> arrangement is that I can deal with firewall problems at my end
> without
> having to get them to fiddle with such mysteries at their end - it
> just
> works. I think it would also be possible to create a script which
> would
> check regularly for a working connection and reconnect if none
> existed, but
> that's for another day/month/year.
>
> In the past (XP and earlier) I've used a script which pops up an
> explanatory
> message box first (giving the option to cancel in case of a finger-
> fumble),
> then checks for a running server and then connects to my hard-coded
> address.
> I'll be happy to send you (or anyone else interested) a copy of this
> on
> request. The essential line is:
>
> WinVNC4.exe -connect <phils-domain-address>
>
> .. where phils-domain-address is a domain name provided by my ISP,
> although
> an IP address will do. If you have a dynamic IP address, you can use
> DynDNS.com (free) to set up a domain name which will track your
> changing IP
> address (assuming you run the update client on at least one running
> machine).
>
> My original question was about Vista. I've found that including the
> term
> "-service" in the line above allows the connection to work (in the
> configurations I've set up), but I need to modify my script to check
> whether
> a server is running as a service or in user-mode, or not at all.
> Nevertheless, if you get the person needing support to check
> manually if the
> server is running (task manager or spot the icon) then that one line
> may be
> all you need in a simple script. Lord knows when I'll get round to
> doing
> the modification to my script, but I doubt it'll turn out to be any
> more
> difficult than what worked well for XP.
>
> I must say that the documentation for Command Line use of RealVNC is
> rather
> inadequate (or is it just hard-to-find?).
>
> Hope that's useful.
>
>
> Philip Herlihy, London
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc [mailto:vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc
> ] On
> Behalf Of Dale Eshelman
> Sent: 21 June 2009 06:11
> To: Philip Herlihy
> Cc: vnc-list [at] realvnc
> Subject: Re: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista
> machine?
>
> I would be interested to know how to create a script in WXP Pro as I
> have never done it.
> Can you provide more information on how to create a script to use and
> how then to use the script?
>
> On Jun 20, 2009, at 8:10 AM, Philip Herlihy wrote:
>
>> On XP machines I've set up a script which invokes a connection to a
>> listening client:
>>
>>> vinvnc4.ext - connect MyClientHost.MyDomain.com
>>
>> - very useful. This doesn't work on Vista. Can anyone advise on
>> how I'd do
>> the equivalent from a command-line or command-file? The Vista box
>> has VNC
>> running as a service.
>>
>> Phil, London
>>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> VNC-List mailing list
> VNC-List [at] realvnc
> To remove yourself from the list visit:
> http://www.realvnc.com/mailman/listinfo/vnc-list
>


Dale Eshelman
eshelmand [at] gmail

ShopToEarn (Dist ID 105985)
http://www.ShopToEarn.net/DaleEshelman

MonaVie (Distr ID 1316953)
http://www.monavie.com/Web/US/en/product_overview.dhtml

The closer I get to the pain of glass in Windoz, the farther I can see
and I see a Mac on the horizon.

_______________________________________________
VNC-List mailing list
VNC-List [at] realvnc
To remove yourself from the list visit:
http://www.realvnc.com/mailman/listinfo/vnc-list


Philip at Herlihy

Jul 6, 2009, 12:00 PM

Post #6 of 7 (2617 views)
Permalink
RE: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine? [now SCRIPTS] [In reply to]

EDIT is pretty old stuff. I just use notepad, or maybe an advanced
programmer's editor like ConText or Crimson Editor (which can highlight
keywords, both free). Sometimes I use Vi on Windows for the "Regular
Expression" support! Just create the text anyhow and save with either .cmd
(preferred) or .bat extension (see here
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batch_file> for differences) - then run it.

The VB family (VB, VBA, VBS) are different. They need a "runtime" to
provide library functions. In Excel VBA, the runtime is built into Excel
(VBA scripts don't run in isolation). In full-blown VB, you have to provide
a runtime as part of the installation package. With VBS, you can use
Cscript.exe or Wscript.exe to provide the necessary environment within the
NT command-line environment. See http://support.microsoft.com/kb/232211 for
more, or see http://technet.microsoft.com/en-gb/scriptcenter/default.aspx
for tons of stuff. Do understand that vanilla NT scripting is considered
really old hat these days.

After my signature I'll paste in a recent (crude) example NT script. Copy
into Notepad and save as PingMonitor.cmd and run it. All it does is loop,
pinging an IP address (set in a variable), in this case the BBC. When it
responds, it plays a sound (your path may vary, as may your file association
for *.wav files), changes the colour of the text in the window and sets the
window's title to "### UP ###". You can leave it running in the background,
minimised, and if you glance at the taskbar icon it tells you the connection
status of the remote machine - that's if you don't notice Windows Media
Player popping up to play the TADA sound! If you need to stop it, use
Control-C in the command window.

If you have VNC running on remote machines which get their addresses from
DHCP, then you have two options. Run a listening client at your end, and
manage your own incoming port forwarding for port 5500. Then the client
simply has to right-click their VNC server icon and enter your IP or domain
address, and it'll connect. To speed this up, you can leave a command
script on their desktop (etc) which runs:
WinVNC4.exe -connect YOURADDRESS
I've wrapped mine up in all sorts of VBS which pops up an information panel
and checks for a running server - this now needs work to cope with Vista.
If you're trying to initiate a connection from a Vista box running VNC as a
service you need to add "-service" in the line above. Here the user is
connecting to you, of course.

The other option is to use Dynamic DNS. I use DynDNS.com. You register for
an account, and add a (free) Dynamic DNS hostname. It picks up your current
IP address, and links that with a third-level domain name you invent,
choosing from a range of second-level domains available. To maintain the
connection when the IP address changes, you should download, configure and
run the updating client available on the DynDNS site (under support). Works
a treat - usually propagates within 5 to 10 minutes after the new address is
detected by the update client. Then, if port forwarding is configured (or
unnecessary) at the remote end, and firewalls are appropriately set, you can
simply give the DynDNS domain name as the remote (server) address in the VNC
client. DynDNS have paid-for services which you might need, depending on
your requirements.

If you're reaching a number of machines through one (reasonably
sophisticated) router, you can set up "rules" to accept VNC connections on
other ports (add a double-colon and the port number after the address in the
client's address box) and have the router configured to route it to the
preferred machine, translating the port to 5900, the standard one for VNC.
If your router can't do that, then you can configure VNC to respond on a
different port, and route that port to the particular machine.

Hope that helps.

Philip Herlihy
:
:
:
:

Here's that example NT script:
=============================

set addr=212.58.254.252
echo off
title down
color 0C
:loop
ping -n 1 -w 10000 %addr% | grep -i "TTL"
if errorlevel 1 GOTO :loop
color 0A
title ### UP ###
C:\WINDOWS\Media\tada.wav
pause


_____

From: Dale Eshelman [mailto:eshelmand [at] gmail]
Sent: 05 July 2009 17:12
To: Philip Herlihy
Subject: Re: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine?
[now SCRIPTS]


Thanks
I have wondered how to do this in Windows. I have written DOS batch files,
UNIX scripts, written COBAL programs, written al lot of Excel macros in
Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). Have heard IT people talk about writing
SCRPTS but did not know what that meant.
I have gone to start-run and typed EDIT. Entered DOS commands and saved the
file with and extension BAT. Did not know there is a command line in Windows
and I guess that is cscript.exe. But not sure how to open a blank window to
enter script. Or do you just open a text editor and start typing, save with
an extension CMD, type the name of the script you just saved and it runs?
Not sure.
Definitely need to find out more about it so I can work on it. Gee I can not
believe I have used windows all this time and not learned about this.

Any guidance would be appreciated or even samples. Very interested in the
VNC thing as we have a number of users with DHCP that we need to come up
with a fixed IP by registering to track (although not sure how this works)
and set up a script to have them run so we do not have to spend a long time
walking them through finding the IP and starting VNC.



Dale

On Jul 5, 2009, at 10:31 AM, Philip Herlihy wrote:


Sorry it's taken so long to respond - inundated with email lately!

From the way you frame your question it sounds as if scripting would be a
new avenue for you. I'll give a brief summary here (for fear of
exasperating experienced scripters). If you want more information, contact
me direct.

"Scripting" simply means storing a series of commands in a file and then
running the file in one go. It's a close cousin to "programming" - loosely,
programs are normally converted into a binary program by a "compiler", while
scripts are usually "interpreted" line by line by some other running
program.

There are several "interpreters" available for Windows NT and its
descendents. If you click Start, Run, then type CMD and click OK you'll get
the familiar DOS-like command interpreter. With a few adjustments, anything
you type in there can be stored in a script and run. If you put the
following lines in a text file:

DIR
PAUSE

.. and save that as mytest.cmd (not mytest.txt) you can double-click it and
you'll see the black window appear with the output of the DIR command (which
lists files) and a line inviting you to press any key to continue (at which
point the screen disappears, which is why many of my scripts end with
PAUSE!). If you Google for "NT Command Line" or "NT Command Scripting"
you'll find loads of resources, and I rather like the book on NT Shell
Scripting by Tim Hill (Macmillan 1998). I tend to use plain NT scripting
for simple scripts.

Other "interpreters" include "Windows Scripting Host" (usually already
installed as part of Windows) which can interpret Visual Basic Script (VBS)
commands, which are much more powerful than the rather creaky NT
command-line interface. I tend to use VBS for more complex scripts, as the
error-handling in NT scripting is rudimentary. VBS can also interact with
Excel and other Office programs in a sophisticated way.

More recently another interpreter has become available, and this promises
something like the (awesome and underused) power of Unix scripting:
PowerShell. Non-trivial, but immensely powerful. Some of Microsoft's
flagship server products are expected to be administered mainly by
Powershell scripting in their most recent versions. I got through two
chapters of the book (still next to my workstation) before other work blew
that away...

How does this affect RealVNC users? Well, I provide the people I support
with a simple script which they click to connect to my "listening client".
I've set up port-forwarding at my end to allow port 5500 through to my
preferred machine, and all Uncle Joe has to do to get my help is
double-click the script's icon on their desktop. The advantage of this
arrangement is that I can deal with firewall problems at my end without
having to get them to fiddle with such mysteries at their end - it just
works. I think it would also be possible to create a script which would
check regularly for a working connection and reconnect if none existed, but
that's for another day/month/year.

In the past (XP and earlier) I've used a script which pops up an explanatory
message box first (giving the option to cancel in case of a finger-fumble),
then checks for a running server and then connects to my hard-coded address.
I'll be happy to send you (or anyone else interested) a copy of this on
request. The essential line is:

WinVNC4.exe -connect <phils-domain-address>

.. where phils-domain-address is a domain name provided by my ISP, although
an IP address will do. If you have a dynamic IP address, you can use
DynDNS.com (free) to set up a domain name which will track your changing IP
address (assuming you run the update client on at least one running
machine).

My original question was about Vista. I've found that including the term
"-service" in the line above allows the connection to work (in the
configurations I've set up), but I need to modify my script to check whether
a server is running as a service or in user-mode, or not at all.
Nevertheless, if you get the person needing support to check manually if the
server is running (task manager or spot the icon) then that one line may be
all you need in a simple script. Lord knows when I'll get round to doing
the modification to my script, but I doubt it'll turn out to be any more
difficult than what worked well for XP.

I must say that the documentation for Command Line use of RealVNC is rather
inadequate (or is it just hard-to-find?).

Hope that's useful.


Philip Herlihy, London



-----Original Message-----
From: vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc [mailto:vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc] On
Behalf Of Dale Eshelman
Sent: 21 June 2009 06:11
To: Philip Herlihy
Cc: vnc-list [at] realvnc
Subject: Re: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine?

I would be interested to know how to create a script in WXP Pro as I
have never done it.
Can you provide more information on how to create a script to use and
how then to use the script?

On Jun 20, 2009, at 8:10 AM, Philip Herlihy wrote:



On XP machines I've set up a script which invokes a connection to a


listening client:



vinvnc4.ext - connect MyClientHost.MyDomain.com



- very useful. This doesn't work on Vista. Can anyone advise on


how I'd do


the equivalent from a command-line or command-file? The Vista box


has VNC


running as a service.



Phil, London






Dale Eshelman
eshelmand [at] gmail

ShopToEarn (Dist ID 105985)
http://www.ShopToEarn.net/DaleEshelman <http://www.ShopToEarn.net/Eshelman>


MonaVie (Distr ID 1316953)
http://www.monavie.com/Web/US/en/product_overview.dhtml


The closer I get to the pain of glass in Windoz, the farther I can see and I
see a Mac on the horizon.

_______________________________________________
VNC-List mailing list
VNC-List [at] realvnc
To remove yourself from the list visit:
http://www.realvnc.com/mailman/listinfo/vnc-list


eshelmand at gmail

Jul 6, 2009, 10:55 PM

Post #7 of 7 (2619 views)
Permalink
Re: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista machine? [now SCRIPTS] [In reply to]

Thanks for the good information. I am excited to get started
developing automated access with VNC through routers to various PCs.

Dale Eshelman
Kansas City, MO

On Jul 6, 2009, at 2:00 PM, Philip Herlihy wrote:

> EDIT is pretty old stuff. I just use notepad, or maybe an advanced
> programmer's editor like ConText or Crimson Editor (which can
> highlight keywords, both free). Sometimes I use Vi on Windows for
> the "Regular Expression" support! Just create the text anyhow and
> save with either .cmd (preferred) or .bat extension (see here for
> differences) - then run it.
>
> The VB family (VB, VBA, VBS) are different. They need a "runtime"
> to provide library functions. In Excel VBA, the runtime is built
> into Excel (VBA scripts don't run in isolation). In full-blown VB,
> you have to provide a runtime as part of the installation package.
> With VBS, you can use Cscript.exe or Wscript.exe to provide the
> necessary environment within the NT command-line environment. See http://support.microsoft.com/kb/232211
> for more, or see http://technet.microsoft.com/en-gb/scriptcenter/default.aspx
> for tons of stuff. Do understand that vanilla NT scripting is
> considered really old hat these days.
>
> After my signature I'll paste in a recent (crude) example NT
> script. Copy into Notepad and save as PingMonitor.cmd and run it.
> All it does is loop, pinging an IP address (set in a variable), in
> this case the BBC. When it responds, it plays a sound (your path
> may vary, as may your file association for *.wav files), changes the
> colour of the text in the window and sets the window's title to "###
> UP ###". You can leave it running in the background, minimised, and
> if you glance at the taskbar icon it tells you the connection status
> of the remote machine - that's if you don't notice Windows Media
> Player popping up to play the TADA sound! If you need to stop it,
> use Control-C in the command window.
>
> If you have VNC running on remote machines which get their addresses
> from DHCP, then you have two options. Run a listening client at
> your end, and manage your own incoming port forwarding for port
> 5500. Then the client simply has to right-click their VNC server
> icon and enter your IP or domain address, and it'll connect. To
> speed this up, you can leave a command script on their desktop (etc)
> which runs:
> WinVNC4.exe -connect YOURADDRESS
> I've wrapped mine up in all sorts of VBS which pops up an
> information panel and checks for a running server - this now needs
> work to cope with Vista. If you're trying to initiate a connection
> from a Vista box running VNC as a service you need to add "-service"
> in the line above. Here the user is connecting to you, of course.
>
> The other option is to use Dynamic DNS. I use DynDNS.com. You
> register for an account, and add a (free) Dynamic DNS hostname. It
> picks up your current IP address, and links that with a third-level
> domain name you invent, choosing from a range of second-level
> domains available. To maintain the connection when the IP address
> changes, you should download, configure and run the updating client
> available on the DynDNS site (under support). Works a treat -
> usually propagates within 5 to 10 minutes after the new address is
> detected by the update client. Then, if port forwarding is
> configured (or unnecessary) at the remote end, and firewalls are
> appropriately set, you can simply give the DynDNS domain name as the
> remote (server) address in the VNC client. DynDNS have paid-for
> services which you might need, depending on your requirements.
>
> If you're reaching a number of machines through one (reasonably
> sophisticated) router, you can set up "rules" to accept VNC
> connections on other ports (add a double-colon and the port number
> after the address in the client's address box) and have the router
> configured to route it to the preferred machine, translating the
> port to 5900, the standard one for VNC. If your router can't do
> that, then you can configure VNC to respond on a different port, and
> route that port to the particular machine.
>
> Hope that helps.
>
> Philip Herlihy
> :
> :
> :
> :
>
> Here's that example NT script:
> =============================
>
> set addr=212.58.254.252
> echo off
> title down
> color 0C
> :loop
> ping -n 1 -w 10000 %addr% | grep -i "TTL"
> if errorlevel 1 GOTO :loop
> color 0A
> title ### UP ###
> C:\WINDOWS\Media\tada.wav
> pause
>
> From: Dale Eshelman [mailto:eshelmand [at] gmail]
> Sent: 05 July 2009 17:12
> To: Philip Herlihy
> Subject: Re: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista
> machine? [now SCRIPTS]
>
> Thanks
> I have wondered how to do this in Windows. I have written DOS batch
> files, UNIX scripts, written COBAL programs, written al lot of Excel
> macros in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). Have heard IT people
> talk about writing SCRPTS but did not know what that meant.
> I have gone to start-run and typed EDIT. Entered DOS commands and
> saved the file with and extension BAT. Did not know there is a
> command line in Windows and I guess that is cscript.exe. But not
> sure how to open a blank window to enter script. Or do you just open
> a text editor and start typing, save with an extension CMD, type the
> name of the script you just saved and it runs? Not sure.
> Definitely need to find out more about it so I can work on it. Gee I
> can not believe I have used windows all this time and not learned
> about this.
>
> Any guidance would be appreciated or even samples. Very interested
> in the VNC thing as we have a number of users with DHCP that we need
> to come up with a fixed IP by registering to track (although not
> sure how this works) and set up a script to have them run so we do
> not have to spend a long time walking them through finding the IP
> and starting VNC.
>
>
> Dale
>
> On Jul 5, 2009, at 10:31 AM, Philip Herlihy wrote:
>
>> Sorry it's taken so long to respond - inundated with email lately!
>>
>> From the way you frame your question it sounds as if scripting
>> would be a
>> new avenue for you. I'll give a brief summary here (for fear of
>> exasperating experienced scripters). If you want more information,
>> contact
>> me direct.
>>
>> "Scripting" simply means storing a series of commands in a file and
>> then
>> running the file in one go. It's a close cousin to "programming" -
>> loosely,
>> programs are normally converted into a binary program by a
>> "compiler", while
>> scripts are usually "interpreted" line by line by some other running
>> program.
>>
>> There are several "interpreters" available for Windows NT and its
>> descendents. If you click Start, Run, then type CMD and click OK
>> you'll get
>> the familiar DOS-like command interpreter. With a few adjustments,
>> anything
>> you type in there can be stored in a script and run. If you put the
>> following lines in a text file:
>>
>> DIR
>> PAUSE
>>
>> .. and save that as mytest.cmd (not mytest.txt) you can double-
>> click it and
>> you'll see the black window appear with the output of the DIR
>> command (which
>> lists files) and a line inviting you to press any key to continue
>> (at which
>> point the screen disappears, which is why many of my scripts end with
>> PAUSE!). If you Google for "NT Command Line" or "NT Command
>> Scripting"
>> you'll find loads of resources, and I rather like the book on NT
>> Shell
>> Scripting by Tim Hill (Macmillan 1998). I tend to use plain NT
>> scripting
>> for simple scripts.
>>
>> Other "interpreters" include "Windows Scripting Host" (usually
>> already
>> installed as part of Windows) which can interpret Visual Basic
>> Script (VBS)
>> commands, which are much more powerful than the rather creaky NT
>> command-line interface. I tend to use VBS for more complex
>> scripts, as the
>> error-handling in NT scripting is rudimentary. VBS can also
>> interact with
>> Excel and other Office programs in a sophisticated way.
>>
>> More recently another interpreter has become available, and this
>> promises
>> something like the (awesome and underused) power of Unix scripting:
>> PowerShell. Non-trivial, but immensely powerful. Some of
>> Microsoft's
>> flagship server products are expected to be administered mainly by
>> Powershell scripting in their most recent versions. I got through
>> two
>> chapters of the book (still next to my workstation) before other
>> work blew
>> that away...
>>
>> How does this affect RealVNC users? Well, I provide the people I
>> support
>> with a simple script which they click to connect to my "listening
>> client".
>> I've set up port-forwarding at my end to allow port 5500 through to
>> my
>> preferred machine, and all Uncle Joe has to do to get my help is
>> double-click the script's icon on their desktop. The advantage of
>> this
>> arrangement is that I can deal with firewall problems at my end
>> without
>> having to get them to fiddle with such mysteries at their end - it
>> just
>> works. I think it would also be possible to create a script which
>> would
>> check regularly for a working connection and reconnect if none
>> existed, but
>> that's for another day/month/year.
>>
>> In the past (XP and earlier) I've used a script which pops up an
>> explanatory
>> message box first (giving the option to cancel in case of a finger-
>> fumble),
>> then checks for a running server and then connects to my hard-coded
>> address.
>> I'll be happy to send you (or anyone else interested) a copy of
>> this on
>> request. The essential line is:
>>
>> WinVNC4.exe -connect <phils-domain-address>
>>
>> .. where phils-domain-address is a domain name provided by my ISP,
>> although
>> an IP address will do. If you have a dynamic IP address, you can use
>> DynDNS.com (free) to set up a domain name which will track your
>> changing IP
>> address (assuming you run the update client on at least one running
>> machine).
>>
>> My original question was about Vista. I've found that including
>> the term
>> "-service" in the line above allows the connection to work (in the
>> configurations I've set up), but I need to modify my script to
>> check whether
>> a server is running as a service or in user-mode, or not at all.
>> Nevertheless, if you get the person needing support to check
>> manually if the
>> server is running (task manager or spot the icon) then that one
>> line may be
>> all you need in a simple script. Lord knows when I'll get round to
>> doing
>> the modification to my script, but I doubt it'll turn out to be any
>> more
>> difficult than what worked well for XP.
>>
>> I must say that the documentation for Command Line use of RealVNC
>> is rather
>> inadequate (or is it just hard-to-find?).
>>
>> Hope that's useful.
>>
>>
>> Philip Herlihy, London
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc [mailto:vnc-list-bounces [at] realvnc
>> ] On
>> Behalf Of Dale Eshelman
>> Sent: 21 June 2009 06:11
>> To: Philip Herlihy
>> Cc: vnc-list [at] realvnc
>> Subject: Re: Command-line connection to listening client from Vista
>> machine?
>>
>> I would be interested to know how to create a script in WXP Pro as I
>> have never done it.
>> Can you provide more information on how to create a script to use and
>> how then to use the script?
>>
>> On Jun 20, 2009, at 8:10 AM, Philip Herlihy wrote:
>>
>>> On XP machines I've set up a script which invokes a connection to a
>>> listening client:
>>>
>>>> vinvnc4.ext - connect MyClientHost.MyDomain.com
>>>
>>> - very useful. This doesn't work on Vista. Can anyone advise on
>>> how I'd do
>>> the equivalent from a command-line or command-file? The Vista box
>>> has VNC
>>> running as a service.
>>>
>>> Phil, London
>>>
>>
>
>
> Dale Eshelman
> eshelmand [at] gmail
>
> ShopToEarn (Dist ID 105985)
> http://www.ShopToEarn.net/DaleEshelman
>
> MonaVie (Distr ID 1316953)
> http://www.monavie.com/Web/US/en/product_overview.dhtml
>
> The closer I get to the pain of glass in Windoz, the farther I can
> see and I see a Mac on the horizon.
>


Dale Eshelman
eshelmand [at] gmail

ShopToEarn (Dist ID 105985)
http://www.ShopToEarn.net/DaleEshelman

MonaVie (Distr ID 1316953)
http://www.monavie.com/Web/US/en/product_overview.dhtml

The closer I get to the pain of glass in Windoz, the farther I can see
and I see a Mac on the horizon.

_______________________________________________
VNC-List mailing list
VNC-List [at] realvnc
To remove yourself from the list visit:
http://www.realvnc.com/mailman/listinfo/vnc-list

VNC list RSS feed   Index | Next | Previous | View Threaded
 
 


Interested in having your list archived? Contact Gossamer Threads
 
  Web Applications & Managed Hosting Powered by Gossamer Threads Inc.