Login | Register For Free | Help
Search for: (Advanced)

Mailing List Archive: MythTV: Dev

Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO!

 

 

MythTV dev RSS feed   Index | Next | Previous | View Threaded


mythtv at clabber

Dec 17, 2002, 5:17 PM

Post #1 of 21 (21986 views)
Permalink
Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO!

Since I've just spent a hair-pulling time getting this lot going, I figured
I'd share the joy and perhaps help others work out how to get this beast
set up. Perhaps it'll even be useful for those using a G400 with TV-out on
the second head.

This is kinda long...

WARNINGS:
** keep a rescue floppy/CD!
** don't blame me if you fry your hardware/TV/monitor trying this. Tweaking
video card settings at the register level can cause signals which may drive
display hardware beyond their design specs. You can kill hardware like
this.
** no warranty expressed or implied, contents under pressure, not suitable
for children, not a floatation device, sell-by date on bottom of package.

So, here we go:

Step 1: Upgrade the G200 BIOS

Step 1.1: Download the latest BIOS for the card from
http://www.matrox.com/mga/support/drivers/bios/home2.cfm

Step 1.2: You'll need to use DOS to flash the BIOS -- I used the FreeDOS
install floppy (available from
http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/micro/pc-stuff/freedos/files/distributions/beta8/instdisk/1.44/)
as a temporary boot disk. dd the image to a floppy, then mount it. Delete
most of the contents, except for the command.com and kernel.sys. Copy in
all the .bin files from the bios .ZIP, plus ubiosdos.exe, dos4gw.exe,
english.mmf, and progbios.exe.
Leave the disk writeable.

Step 1.3: boot the machine from the FreeDOS floppy, and execute:

ubiosdos

I didn't make a backup disk, just pressed enter and let it flash
(note: if things screw up, this could be your undoing)

Step 1.4: force the G200 BIOS to turn on the TV out at boot time:

progbios -maven ntsc (use pal for PAL, and off for, um, off)

Step 1.5: reboot. At this point, I already had my TV connected to the
external breakout box, and was delighted to see the Award BIOS boot
messages. I was able to alter PC BIOS settings, and all. This could be
important... :)

Step 2: Build an appropriate kernel

Step 2.1: I built the following into the kernel (not built as modules):
Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C support
Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C bit-banging interfaces
Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C device interface
Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C /proc interface
Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox acceleration
Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G100/G200/ ...
Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox I2C support
Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G400 second head support
Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox /proc interface

NOTE: you need the G400 second head support even if you have a G200. It
builds the driver for the MAVEN chip, which actually does the TV-out
conversion.

Step 2.2: make dep, make bzImage, make modules, make modules_install. Copy
bzImage to the boot wherever and lilo it. Read
/usr/src/linux/Documentation/fb/matroxfb.txt for options you can pass to
the Matrox framebuffer driver through lilo

You could boot the new kernel at this point if you liked, but make sure
you've kept your monitor attached to the PC, because the MGA console driver
switches to a VESA mode that my TV couldn't display.

Step 3: Set up XFree86

Step 3.1: In your /etc/X11/XF86Config-4, put something like this:

---- Begin snippet ----

Section "Monitor"
Identifier "TV"
VendorName "Unknown"
ModelName "Unknown"
HorizSync 31-50
VertRefresh 60 # This is for NTSC. PAL should use 50
EndSection

Section "Device"
Identifier "My Video Card"
Driver "mga"
BoardName "Unknown"
Option "UseFBDev" "on"
Option "HWCursor" "off"
EndSection

Section "Device"
Identifier "Linux Frame Buffer"
Driver "fbdev"
BoardName "Unknown"
EndSection

Section "Screen"
Identifier "Screen0"
Device "My Video Card"
Monitor "TV"
DefaultDepth 16
Subsection "Display"
Depth 16
Modes "800x600"
EndSubSection
EndSection

---- End snippet ----

Step 3.2: restart X (ctrl-alt-backspace) to make sure it's using the fb
device. Check /var/log/XFree86.0.log to make sure.

Step 3.3: Get matroxset from the MPlayer distribution
(http://www.mplayerhq.hu/homepage/), build and install it (it's in the
TVout subdirectory of the source). Also build and install fbset from the
same distribution.

Get maven-prog from http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/matroxfb.html -- build
it (it'll end up being called "matrox", but you can rename it) and install
it.

Step 3.4: Mirror the framebuffer onto the TV out with matroxset:

matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # use -m 1 for monitor-only, -m 2 for TV only
matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set output 1 to NTSC. Use -o 1 1 for PAL

Step 3.5: Tweak the display

This is where you may end up typing blind. See
http://davedina.apestaart.org/download/doc/Matrox-TVOUT-HOWTO-0.1.txt for a
great explanation

When you have the size and location of the screen set to your liking, use
"maven-prog" (or "matrox", if you didn't rename it) from above to set the
black level, white level, saturation, hue, antialiasing, and whatnot. My
settings are:

matrox 0x0e 0x3f # sets the black level
matrox 0x1e 0xcf # sets the white level
matrox 0x22 0x76 # sets the hue

See http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/maven/mavenreg.html for a description of
the MAVEN chip registers.

I put the resulting fbset and matrox commands in my mythtv user's
.xsession.

Step 3.6: To put the text console back on the TV after the boot process
turns it off, I put the following lines in /etc/rc.sysinit, right after
devfsd is launched:

/sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # both monitor and TV
/sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set TV to NTSC

Step 4: Beer (or tea, coffee, wine, spring water, or whatever)

That's it. I only wish it had been as quick and easy to figure out as it was
to type this up :)

Notes:
** if you built ALSA drivers for a previous kernel, you'll probably have to
build and install them again.
** The G200 (and, presumably, the G400) will display up to 1024x768 through
the miracle of scan conversion, but 800x600 works well for MythTV for me.
** don't be concerned if it seems like X is taking a long time to start up
in a mode that the TV can sync to. My TV also flashes like crazy for about
5 seconds while this is going on. Eventually, it gets there.
** My Shuttle SV24 locks up sometimes with this card. It's reproducible, so
must be a driver problem. It happens when running "make xconfig" from the
linux kernel tree, and sometimes when dragging the scrollbar up or down in
Mozilla. Turning off various acceleration features may resolve this, but I
haven't tried that yet.
** I have run mplayer with the normal Xvideo output in this mode, and it's
just fine. You could also build it with the mga driver and have it use the
hardware acceleration, but I haven't got there yet.


help at pdscc

Dec 17, 2002, 5:34 PM

Post #2 of 21 (17742 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

On 17 Dec 2002 at 16:17, Colin Panisset wrote:

> I didn't make a backup disk, just pressed enter and let it flash
> (note: if things screw up, this could be your undoing)
Actually all you need do is reboot the machine with an autoexec.bat file that
reruns the process automatically. My stepfather has this card and the bios
was continually getting corrupted, the above is pretty much what matrox tech
support told him to do.


--
Harondel J. Sibble
Sibble Computer Consulting
Creating solutions for the small business and home computer user.
help [at] pdscc (use pgp keyid 0x3AD5C11D) http://www.pdscc.com
(604) 739-3709 (voice/fax) (604) 686-2253 (pager)


rdege at cse

Dec 17, 2002, 5:53 PM

Post #3 of 21 (17699 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

Thanks for the info... I have a G200 myself & plan on trying this out.
I'll let you know how the step-by-step goes

-Rob

> Since I've just spent a hair-pulling time getting this lot going, I figured
> I'd share the joy and perhaps help others work out how to get this beast
> set up. Perhaps it'll even be useful for those using a G400 with TV-out on
> the second head.
>
> This is kinda long...
>
> WARNINGS:
> ** keep a rescue floppy/CD!
> ** don't blame me if you fry your hardware/TV/monitor trying this. Tweaking
> video card settings at the register level can cause signals which may drive
> display hardware beyond their design specs. You can kill hardware like
> this.
> ** no warranty expressed or implied, contents under pressure, not suitable
> for children, not a floatation device, sell-by date on bottom of package.
>
> So, here we go:
>
> Step 1: Upgrade the G200 BIOS
>
> Step 1.1: Download the latest BIOS for the card from
> http://www.matrox.com/mga/support/drivers/bios/home2.cfm
>
> Step 1.2: You'll need to use DOS to flash the BIOS -- I used the FreeDOS
> install floppy (available from
> http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/micro/pc-stuff/freedos/files/distributions/beta8/instdisk/1.44/)
> as a temporary boot disk. dd the image to a floppy, then mount it. Delete
> most of the contents, except for the command.com and kernel.sys. Copy in
> all the .bin files from the bios .ZIP, plus ubiosdos.exe, dos4gw.exe,
> english.mmf, and progbios.exe.
> Leave the disk writeable.
>
> Step 1.3: boot the machine from the FreeDOS floppy, and execute:
>
> ubiosdos
>
> I didn't make a backup disk, just pressed enter and let it flash
> (note: if things screw up, this could be your undoing)
>
> Step 1.4: force the G200 BIOS to turn on the TV out at boot time:
>
> progbios -maven ntsc (use pal for PAL, and off for, um, off)
>
> Step 1.5: reboot. At this point, I already had my TV connected to the
> external breakout box, and was delighted to see the Award BIOS boot
> messages. I was able to alter PC BIOS settings, and all. This could be
> important... :)
>
> Step 2: Build an appropriate kernel
>
> Step 2.1: I built the following into the kernel (not built as modules):
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C support
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C bit-banging interfaces
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C device interface
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C /proc interface
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox acceleration
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G100/G200/ ...
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox I2C support
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G400 second head support
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox /proc interface
>
> NOTE: you need the G400 second head support even if you have a G200. It
> builds the driver for the MAVEN chip, which actually does the TV-out
> conversion.
>
> Step 2.2: make dep, make bzImage, make modules, make modules_install. Copy
> bzImage to the boot wherever and lilo it. Read
> /usr/src/linux/Documentation/fb/matroxfb.txt for options you can pass to
> the Matrox framebuffer driver through lilo
>
> You could boot the new kernel at this point if you liked, but make sure
> you've kept your monitor attached to the PC, because the MGA console driver
> switches to a VESA mode that my TV couldn't display.
>
> Step 3: Set up XFree86
>
> Step 3.1: In your /etc/X11/XF86Config-4, put something like this:
>
> ---- Begin snippet ----
>
> Section "Monitor"
> Identifier "TV"
> VendorName "Unknown"
> ModelName "Unknown"
> HorizSync 31-50
> VertRefresh 60 # This is for NTSC. PAL should use 50
> EndSection
>
> Section "Device"
> Identifier "My Video Card"
> Driver "mga"
> BoardName "Unknown"
> Option "UseFBDev" "on"
> Option "HWCursor" "off"
> EndSection
>
> Section "Device"
> Identifier "Linux Frame Buffer"
> Driver "fbdev"
> BoardName "Unknown"
> EndSection
>
> Section "Screen"
> Identifier "Screen0"
> Device "My Video Card"
> Monitor "TV"
> DefaultDepth 16
> Subsection "Display"
> Depth 16
> Modes "800x600"
> EndSubSection
> EndSection
>
> ---- End snippet ----
>
> Step 3.2: restart X (ctrl-alt-backspace) to make sure it's using the fb
> device. Check /var/log/XFree86.0.log to make sure.
>
> Step 3.3: Get matroxset from the MPlayer distribution
> (http://www.mplayerhq.hu/homepage/), build and install it (it's in the
> TVout subdirectory of the source). Also build and install fbset from the
> same distribution.
>
> Get maven-prog from http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/matroxfb.html -- build
> it (it'll end up being called "matrox", but you can rename it) and install
> it.
>
> Step 3.4: Mirror the framebuffer onto the TV out with matroxset:
>
> matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # use -m 1 for monitor-only, -m 2 for TV only
> matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set output 1 to NTSC. Use -o 1 1 for PAL
>
> Step 3.5: Tweak the display
>
> This is where you may end up typing blind. See
> http://davedina.apestaart.org/download/doc/Matrox-TVOUT-HOWTO-0.1.txt for a
> great explanation
>
> When you have the size and location of the screen set to your liking, use
> "maven-prog" (or "matrox", if you didn't rename it) from above to set the
> black level, white level, saturation, hue, antialiasing, and whatnot. My
> settings are:
>
> matrox 0x0e 0x3f # sets the black level
> matrox 0x1e 0xcf # sets the white level
> matrox 0x22 0x76 # sets the hue
>
> See http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/maven/mavenreg.html for a description of
> the MAVEN chip registers.
>
> I put the resulting fbset and matrox commands in my mythtv user's
> .xsession.
>
> Step 3.6: To put the text console back on the TV after the boot process
> turns it off, I put the following lines in /etc/rc.sysinit, right after
> devfsd is launched:
>
> /sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # both monitor and TV
> /sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set TV to NTSC
>
> Step 4: Beer (or tea, coffee, wine, spring water, or whatever)
>
> That's it. I only wish it had been as quick and easy to figure out as it was
> to type this up :)
>
> Notes:
> ** if you built ALSA drivers for a previous kernel, you'll probably have to
> build and install them again.
> ** The G200 (and, presumably, the G400) will display up to 1024x768 through
> the miracle of scan conversion, but 800x600 works well for MythTV for me.
> ** don't be concerned if it seems like X is taking a long time to start up
> in a mode that the TV can sync to. My TV also flashes like crazy for about
> 5 seconds while this is going on. Eventually, it gets there.
> ** My Shuttle SV24 locks up sometimes with this card. It's reproducible, so
> must be a driver problem. It happens when running "make xconfig" from the
> linux kernel tree, and sometimes when dragging the scrollbar up or down in
> Mozilla. Turning off various acceleration features may resolve this, but I
> haven't tried that yet.
> ** I have run mplayer with the normal Xvideo output in this mode, and it's
> just fine. You could also build it with the mga driver and have it use the
> hardware acceleration, but I haven't got there yet.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> mythtv-dev mailing list
> mythtv-dev [at] snowman
> http://www.snowman.net/mailman/listinfo/mythtv-dev
>



Dege

So Many Things in Life Would Be Really Funny
.... If They Weren't Happening To Me


mythtvuser at cencula

Dec 18, 2002, 12:22 AM

Post #4 of 21 (17796 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

Excellent HOWTO, Colin! These instructions worked flawlessly on my dual head
G400 with one (small) exception. I had to type:

matroxset -f /dev/fb1 -m 0

before typing:

matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 3
matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -o 1 2

It currently looks like my fbset command line will be something like:

fbset -fb /dev/fb0 -left 18 -right -98 -upper 47 -lower 6

This fills up the window of my capture card on another computer. I have yet
to try it on an actual TV, however.

Note that the difference in device naming is probably a distro issue. I'm
running RH8.0.

Thanks again,
Mike Cencula

On Tuesday 17 December 2002 19:17, Colin Panisset wrote:
> Since I've just spent a hair-pulling time getting this lot going, I figured
> I'd share the joy and perhaps help others work out how to get this beast
> set up. Perhaps it'll even be useful for those using a G400 with TV-out on
> the second head.
>
> This is kinda long...
>
> WARNINGS:
> ** keep a rescue floppy/CD!
> ** don't blame me if you fry your hardware/TV/monitor trying this.
> Tweaking video card settings at the register level can cause signals which
> may drive display hardware beyond their design specs. You can kill hardware
> like this.
> ** no warranty expressed or implied, contents under pressure, not suitable
> for children, not a floatation device, sell-by date on bottom of package.
>
> So, here we go:
>
> Step 1: Upgrade the G200 BIOS
>
> Step 1.1: Download the latest BIOS for the card from
> http://www.matrox.com/mga/support/drivers/bios/home2.cfm
>
> Step 1.2: You'll need to use DOS to flash the BIOS -- I used the FreeDOS
> install floppy (available from
> http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/micro/pc-stuff/freedos/files/distributions/beta8
>/instdisk/1.44/) as a temporary boot disk. dd the image to a floppy, then
> mount it. Delete most of the contents, except for the command.com and
> kernel.sys. Copy in all the .bin files from the bios .ZIP, plus
> ubiosdos.exe, dos4gw.exe, english.mmf, and progbios.exe.
> Leave the disk writeable.
>
> Step 1.3: boot the machine from the FreeDOS floppy, and execute:
>
> ubiosdos
>
> I didn't make a backup disk, just pressed enter and let it flash
> (note: if things screw up, this could be your undoing)
>
> Step 1.4: force the G200 BIOS to turn on the TV out at boot time:
>
> progbios -maven ntsc (use pal for PAL, and off for, um, off)
>
> Step 1.5: reboot. At this point, I already had my TV connected to the
> external breakout box, and was delighted to see the Award BIOS boot
> messages. I was able to alter PC BIOS settings, and all. This could be
> important... :)
>
> Step 2: Build an appropriate kernel
>
> Step 2.1: I built the following into the kernel (not built as modules):
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C support
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C bit-banging interfaces
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C device interface
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C /proc interface
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox acceleration
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G100/G200/ ...
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox I2C support
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G400 second head support
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox /proc interface
>
> NOTE: you need the G400 second head support even if you have a G200. It
> builds the driver for the MAVEN chip, which actually does the TV-out
> conversion.
>
> Step 2.2: make dep, make bzImage, make modules, make modules_install. Copy
> bzImage to the boot wherever and lilo it. Read
> /usr/src/linux/Documentation/fb/matroxfb.txt for options you can pass to
> the Matrox framebuffer driver through lilo
>
> You could boot the new kernel at this point if you liked, but make sure
> you've kept your monitor attached to the PC, because the MGA console driver
> switches to a VESA mode that my TV couldn't display.
>
> Step 3: Set up XFree86
>
> Step 3.1: In your /etc/X11/XF86Config-4, put something like this:
>
> ---- Begin snippet ----
>
> Section "Monitor"
> Identifier "TV"
> VendorName "Unknown"
> ModelName "Unknown"
> HorizSync 31-50
> VertRefresh 60 # This is for NTSC. PAL should use 50
> EndSection
>
> Section "Device"
> Identifier "My Video Card"
> Driver "mga"
> BoardName "Unknown"
> Option "UseFBDev" "on"
> Option "HWCursor" "off"
> EndSection
>
> Section "Device"
> Identifier "Linux Frame Buffer"
> Driver "fbdev"
> BoardName "Unknown"
> EndSection
>
> Section "Screen"
> Identifier "Screen0"
> Device "My Video Card"
> Monitor "TV"
> DefaultDepth 16
> Subsection "Display"
> Depth 16
> Modes "800x600"
> EndSubSection
> EndSection
>
> ---- End snippet ----
>
> Step 3.2: restart X (ctrl-alt-backspace) to make sure it's using the fb
> device. Check /var/log/XFree86.0.log to make sure.
>
> Step 3.3: Get matroxset from the MPlayer distribution
> (http://www.mplayerhq.hu/homepage/), build and install it (it's in the
> TVout subdirectory of the source). Also build and install fbset from the
> same distribution.
>
> Get maven-prog from http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/matroxfb.html -- build
> it (it'll end up being called "matrox", but you can rename it) and install
> it.
>
> Step 3.4: Mirror the framebuffer onto the TV out with matroxset:
>
> matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # use -m 1 for monitor-only, -m 2 for TV only
> matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set output 1 to NTSC. Use -o 1 1 for PAL
>
> Step 3.5: Tweak the display
>
> This is where you may end up typing blind. See
> http://davedina.apestaart.org/download/doc/Matrox-TVOUT-HOWTO-0.1.txt for
> a great explanation
>
> When you have the size and location of the screen set to your liking, use
> "maven-prog" (or "matrox", if you didn't rename it) from above to set the
> black level, white level, saturation, hue, antialiasing, and whatnot. My
> settings are:
>
> matrox 0x0e 0x3f # sets the black level
> matrox 0x1e 0xcf # sets the white level
> matrox 0x22 0x76 # sets the hue
>
> See http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/maven/mavenreg.html for a description
> of the MAVEN chip registers.
>
> I put the resulting fbset and matrox commands in my mythtv user's
> .xsession.
>
> Step 3.6: To put the text console back on the TV after the boot process
> turns it off, I put the following lines in /etc/rc.sysinit, right after
> devfsd is launched:
>
> /sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # both monitor and TV
> /sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set TV to NTSC
>
> Step 4: Beer (or tea, coffee, wine, spring water, or whatever)
>
> That's it. I only wish it had been as quick and easy to figure out as it
> was to type this up :)
>
> Notes:
> ** if you built ALSA drivers for a previous kernel, you'll probably have
> to build and install them again.
> ** The G200 (and, presumably, the G400) will display up to 1024x768
> through the miracle of scan conversion, but 800x600 works well for MythTV
> for me. ** don't be concerned if it seems like X is taking a long time to
> start up in a mode that the TV can sync to. My TV also flashes like crazy
> for about 5 seconds while this is going on. Eventually, it gets there.
> ** My Shuttle SV24 locks up sometimes with this card. It's reproducible,
> so must be a driver problem. It happens when running "make xconfig" from
> the linux kernel tree, and sometimes when dragging the scrollbar up or down
> in Mozilla. Turning off various acceleration features may resolve this, but
> I haven't tried that yet.
> ** I have run mplayer with the normal Xvideo output in this mode, and it's
> just fine. You could also build it with the mga driver and have it use the
> hardware acceleration, but I haven't got there yet.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> mythtv-dev mailing list
> mythtv-dev [at] snowman
> http://www.snowman.net/mailman/listinfo/mythtv-dev


bjohnson+sender+e33745 at symetrix

Dec 18, 2002, 4:00 AM

Post #5 of 21 (17660 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

I have a Matrox Marvel G400-TV (from what I read, it should work the same as
what you are performing below). However, when I execute the two matroxset
commands, I get:

root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 3
ioctl failed: Invalid argument
root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -o 1 2
ioctl failed: Invalid argument

"matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 1", however, works fine.


lspci says:
"VGA compatible controller: Matrox Graphics, Inc. MGA G400 AGP (rev 04)"

I would think that this would be a result of not using the right option
somewhere when compiling something into the kernel, but I basically have the
same thing you do except for the Matrox /proc interface, which I don't think
is actually required.

I was mostly using this information:
http://www.flashdance.cx/tv-out-mga-fb.html

If anyone could help me along, I would really appreciate it. And yes, I can
provide you with the config file for the kernel that I've built.

Thanks.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Colin Panisset" <mythtv [at] clabber>
To: <mythtv-dev [at] snowman>
Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2002 5:17 PM
Subject: [mythtv] Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO!


> Since I've just spent a hair-pulling time getting this lot going, I
figured
> I'd share the joy and perhaps help others work out how to get this beast
> set up. Perhaps it'll even be useful for those using a G400 with TV-out on
> the second head.
>
> This is kinda long...
>
> WARNINGS:
> ** keep a rescue floppy/CD!
> ** don't blame me if you fry your hardware/TV/monitor trying this.
Tweaking
> video card settings at the register level can cause signals which may
drive
> display hardware beyond their design specs. You can kill hardware like
> this.
> ** no warranty expressed or implied, contents under pressure, not suitable
> for children, not a floatation device, sell-by date on bottom of package.
>
> So, here we go:
>
> Step 1: Upgrade the G200 BIOS
>
> Step 1.1: Download the latest BIOS for the card from
> http://www.matrox.com/mga/support/drivers/bios/home2.cfm
>
> Step 1.2: You'll need to use DOS to flash the BIOS -- I used the FreeDOS
> install floppy (available from
>
http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/micro/pc-stuff/freedos/files/distributions/beta8/
instdisk/1.44/)
> as a temporary boot disk. dd the image to a floppy, then mount it. Delete
> most of the contents, except for the command.com and kernel.sys. Copy in
> all the .bin files from the bios .ZIP, plus ubiosdos.exe, dos4gw.exe,
> english.mmf, and progbios.exe.
> Leave the disk writeable.
>
> Step 1.3: boot the machine from the FreeDOS floppy, and execute:
>
> ubiosdos
>
> I didn't make a backup disk, just pressed enter and let it flash
> (note: if things screw up, this could be your undoing)
>
> Step 1.4: force the G200 BIOS to turn on the TV out at boot time:
>
> progbios -maven ntsc (use pal for PAL, and off for, um, off)
>
> Step 1.5: reboot. At this point, I already had my TV connected to the
> external breakout box, and was delighted to see the Award BIOS boot
> messages. I was able to alter PC BIOS settings, and all. This could be
> important... :)
>
> Step 2: Build an appropriate kernel
>
> Step 2.1: I built the following into the kernel (not built as modules):
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C support
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C bit-banging interfaces
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C device interface
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C /proc interface
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox acceleration
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G100/G200/ ...
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox I2C support
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G400 second head support
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox /proc interface
>
> NOTE: you need the G400 second head support even if you have a G200. It
> builds the driver for the MAVEN chip, which actually does the TV-out
> conversion.
>
> Step 2.2: make dep, make bzImage, make modules, make modules_install. Copy
> bzImage to the boot wherever and lilo it. Read
> /usr/src/linux/Documentation/fb/matroxfb.txt for options you can pass to
> the Matrox framebuffer driver through lilo
>
> You could boot the new kernel at this point if you liked, but make sure
> you've kept your monitor attached to the PC, because the MGA console
driver
> switches to a VESA mode that my TV couldn't display.
>
> Step 3: Set up XFree86
>
> Step 3.1: In your /etc/X11/XF86Config-4, put something like this:
>
> ---- Begin snippet ----
>
> Section "Monitor"
> Identifier "TV"
> VendorName "Unknown"
> ModelName "Unknown"
> HorizSync 31-50
> VertRefresh 60 # This is for NTSC. PAL should use 50
> EndSection
>
> Section "Device"
> Identifier "My Video Card"
> Driver "mga"
> BoardName "Unknown"
> Option "UseFBDev" "on"
> Option "HWCursor" "off"
> EndSection
>
> Section "Device"
> Identifier "Linux Frame Buffer"
> Driver "fbdev"
> BoardName "Unknown"
> EndSection
>
> Section "Screen"
> Identifier "Screen0"
> Device "My Video Card"
> Monitor "TV"
> DefaultDepth 16
> Subsection "Display"
> Depth 16
> Modes "800x600"
> EndSubSection
> EndSection
>
> ---- End snippet ----
>
> Step 3.2: restart X (ctrl-alt-backspace) to make sure it's using the fb
> device. Check /var/log/XFree86.0.log to make sure.
>
> Step 3.3: Get matroxset from the MPlayer distribution
> (http://www.mplayerhq.hu/homepage/), build and install it (it's in the
> TVout subdirectory of the source). Also build and install fbset from the
> same distribution.
>
> Get maven-prog from http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/matroxfb.html -- build
> it (it'll end up being called "matrox", but you can rename it) and install
> it.
>
> Step 3.4: Mirror the framebuffer onto the TV out with matroxset:
>
> matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # use -m 1 for monitor-only, -m 2 for TV only
> matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set output 1 to NTSC. Use -o 1 1 for PAL
>
> Step 3.5: Tweak the display
>
> This is where you may end up typing blind. See
> http://davedina.apestaart.org/download/doc/Matrox-TVOUT-HOWTO-0.1.txt for
a
> great explanation
>
> When you have the size and location of the screen set to your liking, use
> "maven-prog" (or "matrox", if you didn't rename it) from above to set the
> black level, white level, saturation, hue, antialiasing, and whatnot. My
> settings are:
>
> matrox 0x0e 0x3f # sets the black level
> matrox 0x1e 0xcf # sets the white level
> matrox 0x22 0x76 # sets the hue
>
> See http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/maven/mavenreg.html for a description
of
> the MAVEN chip registers.
>
> I put the resulting fbset and matrox commands in my mythtv user's
> .xsession.
>
> Step 3.6: To put the text console back on the TV after the boot process
> turns it off, I put the following lines in /etc/rc.sysinit, right after
> devfsd is launched:
>
> /sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # both monitor and TV
> /sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set TV to NTSC
>
> Step 4: Beer (or tea, coffee, wine, spring water, or whatever)
>
> That's it. I only wish it had been as quick and easy to figure out as it
was
> to type this up :)
>
> Notes:
> ** if you built ALSA drivers for a previous kernel, you'll probably have
to
> build and install them again.
> ** The G200 (and, presumably, the G400) will display up to 1024x768
through
> the miracle of scan conversion, but 800x600 works well for MythTV for me.
> ** don't be concerned if it seems like X is taking a long time to start up
> in a mode that the TV can sync to. My TV also flashes like crazy for about
> 5 seconds while this is going on. Eventually, it gets there.
> ** My Shuttle SV24 locks up sometimes with this card. It's reproducible,
so
> must be a driver problem. It happens when running "make xconfig" from the
> linux kernel tree, and sometimes when dragging the scrollbar up or down in
> Mozilla. Turning off various acceleration features may resolve this, but I
> haven't tried that yet.
> ** I have run mplayer with the normal Xvideo output in this mode, and it's
> just fine. You could also build it with the mga driver and have it use the
> hardware acceleration, but I haven't got there yet.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> mythtv-dev mailing list
> mythtv-dev [at] snowman
> http://www.snowman.net/mailman/listinfo/mythtv-dev
>


mythtvuser at cencula

Dec 18, 2002, 6:26 AM

Post #6 of 21 (17592 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

Read my post to the list earlier this morning.

On Wednesday 18 December 2002 06:00, Bernard Johnson wrote:
> I have a Matrox Marvel G400-TV (from what I read, it should work the same
> as what you are performing below). However, when I execute the two
> matroxset commands, I get:
>
> root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 3
> ioctl failed: Invalid argument
> root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -o 1 2
> ioctl failed: Invalid argument
>
> "matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 1", however, works fine.
>
>
> lspci says:
> "VGA compatible controller: Matrox Graphics, Inc. MGA G400 AGP (rev 04)"
>
> I would think that this would be a result of not using the right option
> somewhere when compiling something into the kernel, but I basically have
> the same thing you do except for the Matrox /proc interface, which I don't
> think is actually required.
>
> I was mostly using this information:
> http://www.flashdance.cx/tv-out-mga-fb.html
>
> If anyone could help me along, I would really appreciate it. And yes, I
> can provide you with the config file for the kernel that I've built.
>
> Thanks.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Colin Panisset" <mythtv [at] clabber>
> To: <mythtv-dev [at] snowman>
> Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2002 5:17 PM
> Subject: [mythtv] Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO!
>
> > Since I've just spent a hair-pulling time getting this lot going, I
>
> figured
>
> > I'd share the joy and perhaps help others work out how to get this beast
> > set up. Perhaps it'll even be useful for those using a G400 with TV-out
> > on the second head.
> >
> > This is kinda long...
> >
> > WARNINGS:
> > ** keep a rescue floppy/CD!
> > ** don't blame me if you fry your hardware/TV/monitor trying this.
>
> Tweaking
>
> > video card settings at the register level can cause signals which may
>
> drive
>
> > display hardware beyond their design specs. You can kill hardware like
> > this.
> > ** no warranty expressed or implied, contents under pressure, not
> > suitable for children, not a floatation device, sell-by date on bottom of
> > package.
> >
> > So, here we go:
> >
> > Step 1: Upgrade the G200 BIOS
> >
> > Step 1.1: Download the latest BIOS for the card from
> > http://www.matrox.com/mga/support/drivers/bios/home2.cfm
> >
> > Step 1.2: You'll need to use DOS to flash the BIOS -- I used the FreeDOS
> > install floppy (available from
>
> http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/micro/pc-stuff/freedos/files/distributions/beta8
>/ instdisk/1.44/)
>
> > as a temporary boot disk. dd the image to a floppy, then mount it. Delete
> > most of the contents, except for the command.com and kernel.sys. Copy in
> > all the .bin files from the bios .ZIP, plus ubiosdos.exe, dos4gw.exe,
> > english.mmf, and progbios.exe.
> > Leave the disk writeable.
> >
> > Step 1.3: boot the machine from the FreeDOS floppy, and execute:
> >
> > ubiosdos
> >
> > I didn't make a backup disk, just pressed enter and let it flash
> > (note: if things screw up, this could be your undoing)
> >
> > Step 1.4: force the G200 BIOS to turn on the TV out at boot time:
> >
> > progbios -maven ntsc (use pal for PAL, and off for, um, off)
> >
> > Step 1.5: reboot. At this point, I already had my TV connected to the
> > external breakout box, and was delighted to see the Award BIOS boot
> > messages. I was able to alter PC BIOS settings, and all. This could be
> > important... :)
> >
> > Step 2: Build an appropriate kernel
> >
> > Step 2.1: I built the following into the kernel (not built as modules):
> > Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C support
> > Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C bit-banging interfaces
> > Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C device interface
> > Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C /proc interface
> > Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox acceleration
> > Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G100/G200/ ...
> > Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox I2C support
> > Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G400 second head support
> > Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox /proc interface
> >
> > NOTE: you need the G400 second head support even if you have a G200. It
> > builds the driver for the MAVEN chip, which actually does the TV-out
> > conversion.
> >
> > Step 2.2: make dep, make bzImage, make modules, make modules_install.
> > Copy bzImage to the boot wherever and lilo it. Read
> > /usr/src/linux/Documentation/fb/matroxfb.txt for options you can pass to
> > the Matrox framebuffer driver through lilo
> >
> > You could boot the new kernel at this point if you liked, but make sure
> > you've kept your monitor attached to the PC, because the MGA console
>
> driver
>
> > switches to a VESA mode that my TV couldn't display.
> >
> > Step 3: Set up XFree86
> >
> > Step 3.1: In your /etc/X11/XF86Config-4, put something like this:
> >
> > ---- Begin snippet ----
> >
> > Section "Monitor"
> > Identifier "TV"
> > VendorName "Unknown"
> > ModelName "Unknown"
> > HorizSync 31-50
> > VertRefresh 60 # This is for NTSC. PAL should use 50
> > EndSection
> >
> > Section "Device"
> > Identifier "My Video Card"
> > Driver "mga"
> > BoardName "Unknown"
> > Option "UseFBDev" "on"
> > Option "HWCursor" "off"
> > EndSection
> >
> > Section "Device"
> > Identifier "Linux Frame Buffer"
> > Driver "fbdev"
> > BoardName "Unknown"
> > EndSection
> >
> > Section "Screen"
> > Identifier "Screen0"
> > Device "My Video Card"
> > Monitor "TV"
> > DefaultDepth 16
> > Subsection "Display"
> > Depth 16
> > Modes "800x600"
> > EndSubSection
> > EndSection
> >
> > ---- End snippet ----
> >
> > Step 3.2: restart X (ctrl-alt-backspace) to make sure it's using the fb
> > device. Check /var/log/XFree86.0.log to make sure.
> >
> > Step 3.3: Get matroxset from the MPlayer distribution
> > (http://www.mplayerhq.hu/homepage/), build and install it (it's in the
> > TVout subdirectory of the source). Also build and install fbset from the
> > same distribution.
> >
> > Get maven-prog from http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/matroxfb.html -- build
> > it (it'll end up being called "matrox", but you can rename it) and
> > install it.
> >
> > Step 3.4: Mirror the framebuffer onto the TV out with matroxset:
> >
> > matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # use -m 1 for monitor-only, -m 2 for TV only
> > matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set output 1 to NTSC. Use -o 1 1 for PAL
> >
> > Step 3.5: Tweak the display
> >
> > This is where you may end up typing blind. See
> > http://davedina.apestaart.org/download/doc/Matrox-TVOUT-HOWTO-0.1.txt for
>
> a
>
> > great explanation
> >
> > When you have the size and location of the screen set to your liking, use
> > "maven-prog" (or "matrox", if you didn't rename it) from above to set the
> > black level, white level, saturation, hue, antialiasing, and whatnot. My
> > settings are:
> >
> > matrox 0x0e 0x3f # sets the black level
> > matrox 0x1e 0xcf # sets the white level
> > matrox 0x22 0x76 # sets the hue
> >
> > See http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/maven/mavenreg.html for a description
>
> of
>
> > the MAVEN chip registers.
> >
> > I put the resulting fbset and matrox commands in my mythtv user's
> > .xsession.
> >
> > Step 3.6: To put the text console back on the TV after the boot process
> > turns it off, I put the following lines in /etc/rc.sysinit, right after
> > devfsd is launched:
> >
> > /sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # both monitor and TV
> > /sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set TV to NTSC
> >
> > Step 4: Beer (or tea, coffee, wine, spring water, or whatever)
> >
> > That's it. I only wish it had been as quick and easy to figure out as it
>
> was
>
> > to type this up :)
> >
> > Notes:
> > ** if you built ALSA drivers for a previous kernel, you'll probably have
>
> to
>
> > build and install them again.
> > ** The G200 (and, presumably, the G400) will display up to 1024x768
>
> through
>
> > the miracle of scan conversion, but 800x600 works well for MythTV for me.
> > ** don't be concerned if it seems like X is taking a long time to start
> > up in a mode that the TV can sync to. My TV also flashes like crazy for
> > about 5 seconds while this is going on. Eventually, it gets there.
> > ** My Shuttle SV24 locks up sometimes with this card. It's reproducible,
>
> so
>
> > must be a driver problem. It happens when running "make xconfig" from the
> > linux kernel tree, and sometimes when dragging the scrollbar up or down
> > in Mozilla. Turning off various acceleration features may resolve this,
> > but I haven't tried that yet.
> > ** I have run mplayer with the normal Xvideo output in this mode, and
> > it's just fine. You could also build it with the mga driver and have it
> > use the hardware acceleration, but I haven't got there yet.
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > mythtv-dev mailing list
> > mythtv-dev [at] snowman
> > http://www.snowman.net/mailman/listinfo/mythtv-dev
>
> _______________________________________________
> mythtv-dev mailing list
> mythtv-dev [at] snowman
> http://www.snowman.net/mailman/listinfo/mythtv-dev


maillists at sonictech

Dec 18, 2002, 7:20 AM

Post #7 of 21 (17471 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

On Wed, Dec 18, 2002 at 04:00:54AM -0700, Bernard Johnson wrote:
> I have a Matrox Marvel G400-TV (from what I read, it should work the same as
> what you are performing below). However, when I execute the two matroxset
> commands, I get:
>
> root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 3
> ioctl failed: Invalid argument
> root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -o 1 2
> ioctl failed: Invalid argument
>
> "matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 1", however, works fine.

Try doing this before loading the marvel capture drivers/modules.

--
Ray


maillists at sonictech

Dec 18, 2002, 7:23 AM

Post #8 of 21 (17565 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

On Wed, Dec 18, 2002 at 02:22:21AM -0500, Michael D. Cencula wrote:
> Excellent HOWTO, Colin! These instructions worked flawlessly on my dual head
> G400 with one (small) exception. I had to type:
>
> matroxset -f /dev/fb1 -m 0
>
> before typing:
>
> matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 3
> matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -o 1 2
>
> It currently looks like my fbset command line will be something like:
>
> fbset -fb /dev/fb0 -left 18 -right -98 -upper 47 -lower 6
>
> This fills up the window of my capture card on another computer. I have yet
> to try it on an actual TV, however.
>
> Note that the difference in device naming is probably a distro issue. I'm
> running RH8.0.

I'm pretty sure it's due to the fact that your G400 is a dual head card and
his G200 is a single head card.

--
Ray


bjohnson+sender+e33745 at symetrix

Dec 18, 2002, 8:44 AM

Post #9 of 21 (17632 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

It seems to be an order independent problem....

----- Original Message -----
From: "Michael D. Cencula" <mythtvuser [at] cencula>
To: <mythtv-dev [at] snowman>
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2002 6:26 AM
Subject: Re: [mythtv] Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO!


> Read my post to the list earlier this morning.
>
> On Wednesday 18 December 2002 06:00, Bernard Johnson wrote:
> > I have a Matrox Marvel G400-TV (from what I read, it should work the
same
> > as what you are performing below). However, when I execute the two
> > matroxset commands, I get:
> >
> > root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 3
> > ioctl failed: Invalid argument
> > root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -o 1 2
> > ioctl failed: Invalid argument
> >
> > "matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 1", however, works fine.
> >
> >
> > lspci says:
> > "VGA compatible controller: Matrox Graphics, Inc. MGA G400 AGP (rev 04)"
> >
> > I would think that this would be a result of not using the right option
> > somewhere when compiling something into the kernel, but I basically have
> > the same thing you do except for the Matrox /proc interface, which I
don't
> > think is actually required.
> >
> > I was mostly using this information:
> > http://www.flashdance.cx/tv-out-mga-fb.html
> >
> > If anyone could help me along, I would really appreciate it. And yes, I
> > can provide you with the config file for the kernel that I've built.
> >
> > Thanks.
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Colin Panisset" <mythtv [at] clabber>
> > To: <mythtv-dev [at] snowman>
> > Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2002 5:17 PM
> > Subject: [mythtv] Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO!
> >
> > > Since I've just spent a hair-pulling time getting this lot going, I
> >
> > figured
> >
> > > I'd share the joy and perhaps help others work out how to get this
beast
> > > set up. Perhaps it'll even be useful for those using a G400 with
TV-out
> > > on the second head.
> > >
> > > This is kinda long...
> > >
> > > WARNINGS:
> > > ** keep a rescue floppy/CD!
> > > ** don't blame me if you fry your hardware/TV/monitor trying this.
> >
> > Tweaking
> >
> > > video card settings at the register level can cause signals which may
> >
> > drive
> >
> > > display hardware beyond their design specs. You can kill hardware like
> > > this.
> > > ** no warranty expressed or implied, contents under pressure, not
> > > suitable for children, not a floatation device, sell-by date on bottom
of
> > > package.
> > >
> > > So, here we go:
> > >
> > > Step 1: Upgrade the G200 BIOS
> > >
> > > Step 1.1: Download the latest BIOS for the card from
> > > http://www.matrox.com/mga/support/drivers/bios/home2.cfm
> > >
> > > Step 1.2: You'll need to use DOS to flash the BIOS -- I used the
FreeDOS
> > > install floppy (available from
> >
> >
http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/micro/pc-stuff/freedos/files/distributions/beta8
> >/ instdisk/1.44/)
> >
> > > as a temporary boot disk. dd the image to a floppy, then mount it.
Delete
> > > most of the contents, except for the command.com and kernel.sys. Copy
in
> > > all the .bin files from the bios .ZIP, plus ubiosdos.exe, dos4gw.exe,
> > > english.mmf, and progbios.exe.
> > > Leave the disk writeable.
> > >
> > > Step 1.3: boot the machine from the FreeDOS floppy, and execute:
> > >
> > > ubiosdos
> > >
> > > I didn't make a backup disk, just pressed enter and let it flash
> > > (note: if things screw up, this could be your undoing)
> > >
> > > Step 1.4: force the G200 BIOS to turn on the TV out at boot time:
> > >
> > > progbios -maven ntsc (use pal for PAL, and off for, um, off)
> > >
> > > Step 1.5: reboot. At this point, I already had my TV connected to the
> > > external breakout box, and was delighted to see the Award BIOS boot
> > > messages. I was able to alter PC BIOS settings, and all. This could be
> > > important... :)
> > >
> > > Step 2: Build an appropriate kernel
> > >
> > > Step 2.1: I built the following into the kernel (not built as
modules):
> > > Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C support
> > > Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C bit-banging interfaces
> > > Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C device interface
> > > Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C /proc interface
> > > Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox acceleration
> > > Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G100/G200/ ...
> > > Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox I2C support
> > > Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G400 second head support
> > > Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox /proc interface
> > >
> > > NOTE: you need the G400 second head support even if you have a G200.
It
> > > builds the driver for the MAVEN chip, which actually does the TV-out
> > > conversion.
> > >
> > > Step 2.2: make dep, make bzImage, make modules, make modules_install.
> > > Copy bzImage to the boot wherever and lilo it. Read
> > > /usr/src/linux/Documentation/fb/matroxfb.txt for options you can pass
to
> > > the Matrox framebuffer driver through lilo
> > >
> > > You could boot the new kernel at this point if you liked, but make
sure
> > > you've kept your monitor attached to the PC, because the MGA console
> >
> > driver
> >
> > > switches to a VESA mode that my TV couldn't display.
> > >
> > > Step 3: Set up XFree86
> > >
> > > Step 3.1: In your /etc/X11/XF86Config-4, put something like this:
> > >
> > > ---- Begin snippet ----
> > >
> > > Section "Monitor"
> > > Identifier "TV"
> > > VendorName "Unknown"
> > > ModelName "Unknown"
> > > HorizSync 31-50
> > > VertRefresh 60 # This is for NTSC. PAL should use 50
> > > EndSection
> > >
> > > Section "Device"
> > > Identifier "My Video Card"
> > > Driver "mga"
> > > BoardName "Unknown"
> > > Option "UseFBDev" "on"
> > > Option "HWCursor" "off"
> > > EndSection
> > >
> > > Section "Device"
> > > Identifier "Linux Frame Buffer"
> > > Driver "fbdev"
> > > BoardName "Unknown"
> > > EndSection
> > >
> > > Section "Screen"
> > > Identifier "Screen0"
> > > Device "My Video Card"
> > > Monitor "TV"
> > > DefaultDepth 16
> > > Subsection "Display"
> > > Depth 16
> > > Modes "800x600"
> > > EndSubSection
> > > EndSection
> > >
> > > ---- End snippet ----
> > >
> > > Step 3.2: restart X (ctrl-alt-backspace) to make sure it's using the
fb
> > > device. Check /var/log/XFree86.0.log to make sure.
> > >
> > > Step 3.3: Get matroxset from the MPlayer distribution
> > > (http://www.mplayerhq.hu/homepage/), build and install it (it's in the
> > > TVout subdirectory of the source). Also build and install fbset from
the
> > > same distribution.
> > >
> > > Get maven-prog from http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/matroxfb.html --
build
> > > it (it'll end up being called "matrox", but you can rename it) and
> > > install it.
> > >
> > > Step 3.4: Mirror the framebuffer onto the TV out with matroxset:
> > >
> > > matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # use -m 1 for monitor-only, -m 2 for TV
only
> > > matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set output 1 to NTSC. Use -o 1 1 for
PAL
> > >
> > > Step 3.5: Tweak the display
> > >
> > > This is where you may end up typing blind. See
> > > http://davedina.apestaart.org/download/doc/Matrox-TVOUT-HOWTO-0.1.txt
for
> >
> > a
> >
> > > great explanation
> > >
> > > When you have the size and location of the screen set to your liking,
use
> > > "maven-prog" (or "matrox", if you didn't rename it) from above to set
the
> > > black level, white level, saturation, hue, antialiasing, and whatnot.
My
> > > settings are:
> > >
> > > matrox 0x0e 0x3f # sets the black level
> > > matrox 0x1e 0xcf # sets the white level
> > > matrox 0x22 0x76 # sets the hue
> > >
> > > See http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/maven/mavenreg.html for a
description
> >
> > of
> >
> > > the MAVEN chip registers.
> > >
> > > I put the resulting fbset and matrox commands in my mythtv user's
> > > .xsession.
> > >
> > > Step 3.6: To put the text console back on the TV after the boot
process
> > > turns it off, I put the following lines in /etc/rc.sysinit, right
after
> > > devfsd is launched:
> > >
> > > /sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # both monitor and TV
> > > /sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set TV to NTSC
> > >
> > > Step 4: Beer (or tea, coffee, wine, spring water, or whatever)
> > >
> > > That's it. I only wish it had been as quick and easy to figure out as
it
> >
> > was
> >
> > > to type this up :)
> > >
> > > Notes:
> > > ** if you built ALSA drivers for a previous kernel, you'll probably
have
> >
> > to
> >
> > > build and install them again.
> > > ** The G200 (and, presumably, the G400) will display up to 1024x768
> >
> > through
> >
> > > the miracle of scan conversion, but 800x600 works well for MythTV for
me.
> > > ** don't be concerned if it seems like X is taking a long time to
start
> > > up in a mode that the TV can sync to. My TV also flashes like crazy
for
> > > about 5 seconds while this is going on. Eventually, it gets there.
> > > ** My Shuttle SV24 locks up sometimes with this card. It's
reproducible,
> >
> > so
> >
> > > must be a driver problem. It happens when running "make xconfig" from
the
> > > linux kernel tree, and sometimes when dragging the scrollbar up or
down
> > > in Mozilla. Turning off various acceleration features may resolve
this,
> > > but I haven't tried that yet.
> > > ** I have run mplayer with the normal Xvideo output in this mode, and
> > > it's just fine. You could also build it with the mga driver and have
it
> > > use the hardware acceleration, but I haven't got there yet.
> > >
> > >
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > mythtv-dev mailing list
> > > mythtv-dev [at] snowman
> > > http://www.snowman.net/mailman/listinfo/mythtv-dev
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > mythtv-dev mailing list
> > mythtv-dev [at] snowman
> > http://www.snowman.net/mailman/listinfo/mythtv-dev
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> mythtv-dev mailing list
> mythtv-dev [at] snowman
> http://www.snowman.net/mailman/listinfo/mythtv-dev
>


bjohnson+sender+e33745 at symetrix

Dec 18, 2002, 6:27 PM

Post #10 of 21 (17494 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

Actually, I got it working today.... I had *thought* my matroxfb_maven
driver was being loaded, but it wasn't (something funky in my modules.conf).
If I load that by hand, then the instructions work as advertised.

Thanks for all the help.

Is anyone interested in the kernels that I've built for this in rpm format
for redhat 8 (based on the redhat 2.4.18-18.8.0 kernel)??? It sure makes
for an easy install :) It should give fb support to any G200/G400.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ray" <maillists [at] sonictech>
To: <mythtv-dev [at] snowman>
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2002 7:20 AM
Subject: Re: [mythtv] Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO!


> On Wed, Dec 18, 2002 at 04:00:54AM -0700, Bernard Johnson wrote:
> > I have a Matrox Marvel G400-TV (from what I read, it should work the
same as
> > what you are performing below). However, when I execute the two
matroxset
> > commands, I get:
> >
> > root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 3
> > ioctl failed: Invalid argument
> > root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -o 1 2
> > ioctl failed: Invalid argument
> >
> > "matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 1", however, works fine.
>
> Try doing this before loading the marvel capture drivers/modules.


johnmythtv at crombe

Jan 8, 2003, 3:48 PM

Post #11 of 21 (17554 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

Hi all,

Well, I've just ordered myself a G200 (16mb AGP) and am ready to take the
MythTV plunge! It will be a dedicated MythTV system. I have read the G200
How-To (several times) and the additions to it. Here's the problem...

I'm a very experienced s/w developer, but it's all in Windows (and DOS
device drivers if that counts for anything ;-). I have a boxed copy of SuSE
8.0 Personal here next to me and a PIII-800, 512mb RAM, 80gb ready to use.
The problem is that I don't know what the best version of Linux is for my
G200 setup? Isaac uses Debian Unstable, Ray (below) has a RH 8 RPM but
that's just the kernels (not sure how close that gets me?), and other
threads say Gentoo is fastest. Ideally, I'd download an ISO image, burn it,
and install the new system from that, but I know that's asking waaaay to
much. So, what's the simplest way to get this new system up-and-running?
I've only installed Linux twice and both times from "pre-packaged" installs.
HD formats and cmd lines don't scare me. Docs that "assume" a lot do. ;-)

If I downloaded the Debian image Isaac points us to and installed it, it
wouldn't have the support for the G200 built-in right? Is it an easy add
then or do you almost start over to add that?

I'm willing to learn and contribute code (lots of C++ experience). Would I
be best off going for the CVS setup?

Thanks VERY much!
John

P.S. One other note... Apparently h/w MJPEG support for the G200 was added
after .7 so does this mean CVS is the way to go? Or, should I do .7 and
when .8 comes out in the next few weeks (any guesses here?), I'll just see a
big improvement?

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bernard Johnson" <bjohnson+sender+e33745 [at] symetrix>
To: <mythtv-dev [at] snowman>
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2002 8:27 PM
Subject: Re: [mythtv] Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO!


> Actually, I got it working today.... I had *thought* my matroxfb_maven
> driver was being loaded, but it wasn't (something funky in my
modules.conf).
> If I load that by hand, then the instructions work as advertised.
>
> Thanks for all the help.
>
> Is anyone interested in the kernels that I've built for this in rpm format
> for redhat 8 (based on the redhat 2.4.18-18.8.0 kernel)??? It sure makes
> for an easy install :) It should give fb support to any G200/G400.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Ray" <maillists [at] sonictech>
> To: <mythtv-dev [at] snowman>
> Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2002 7:20 AM
> Subject: Re: [mythtv] Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO!
>
>
> > On Wed, Dec 18, 2002 at 04:00:54AM -0700, Bernard Johnson wrote:
> > > I have a Matrox Marvel G400-TV (from what I read, it should work the
> same as
> > > what you are performing below). However, when I execute the two
> matroxset
> > > commands, I get:
> > >
> > > root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 3
> > > ioctl failed: Invalid argument
> > > root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -o 1 2
> > > ioctl failed: Invalid argument
> > >
> > > "matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 1", however, works fine.
> >
> > Try doing this before loading the marvel capture drivers/modules.
> _______________________________________________
> mythtv-dev mailing list
> mythtv-dev [at] snowman
> http://www.snowman.net/mailman/listinfo/mythtv-dev
>
>


nathan at viptx

Jan 8, 2003, 4:05 PM

Post #12 of 21 (17613 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

The mythtv docs are very well done and should be able to assist you
through a mandrake setup or a RedHat 8 setup. For ease of mythtv
install there are installation packages for debian which might be good
for you.

I would suggest you fool around with Linux for some time before tackling
mythtv. Your gonna need to know some things about Linux first.


On Wed, 2003-01-08 at 16:48, John wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> Well, I've just ordered myself a G200 (16mb AGP) and am ready to take the
> MythTV plunge! It will be a dedicated MythTV system. I have read the G200
> How-To (several times) and the additions to it. Here's the problem...
>
> I'm a very experienced s/w developer, but it's all in Windows (and DOS
> device drivers if that counts for anything ;-). I have a boxed copy of SuSE
> 8.0 Personal here next to me and a PIII-800, 512mb RAM, 80gb ready to use.
> The problem is that I don't know what the best version of Linux is for my
> G200 setup? Isaac uses Debian Unstable, Ray (below) has a RH 8 RPM but
> that's just the kernels (not sure how close that gets me?), and other
> threads say Gentoo is fastest. Ideally, I'd download an ISO image, burn it,
> and install the new system from that, but I know that's asking waaaay to
> much. So, what's the simplest way to get this new system up-and-running?
> I've only installed Linux twice and both times from "pre-packaged" installs.
> HD formats and cmd lines don't scare me. Docs that "assume" a lot do. ;-)
>
> If I downloaded the Debian image Isaac points us to and installed it, it
> wouldn't have the support for the G200 built-in right? Is it an easy add
> then or do you almost start over to add that?
>
> I'm willing to learn and contribute code (lots of C++ experience). Would I
> be best off going for the CVS setup?
>
> Thanks VERY much!
> John
>
> P.S. One other note... Apparently h/w MJPEG support for the G200 was added
> after .7 so does this mean CVS is the way to go? Or, should I do .7 and
> when .8 comes out in the next few weeks (any guesses here?), I'll just see a
> big improvement?
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Bernard Johnson" <bjohnson+sender+e33745 [at] symetrix>
> To: <mythtv-dev [at] snowman>
> Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2002 8:27 PM
> Subject: Re: [mythtv] Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO!
>
>
> > Actually, I got it working today.... I had *thought* my matroxfb_maven
> > driver was being loaded, but it wasn't (something funky in my
> modules.conf).
> > If I load that by hand, then the instructions work as advertised.
> >
> > Thanks for all the help.
> >
> > Is anyone interested in the kernels that I've built for this in rpm format
> > for redhat 8 (based on the redhat 2.4.18-18.8.0 kernel)??? It sure makes
> > for an easy install :) It should give fb support to any G200/G400.
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Ray" <maillists [at] sonictech>
> > To: <mythtv-dev [at] snowman>
> > Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2002 7:20 AM
> > Subject: Re: [mythtv] Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO!
> >
> >
> > > On Wed, Dec 18, 2002 at 04:00:54AM -0700, Bernard Johnson wrote:
> > > > I have a Matrox Marvel G400-TV (from what I read, it should work the
> > same as
> > > > what you are performing below). However, when I execute the two
> > matroxset
> > > > commands, I get:
> > > >
> > > > root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 3
> > > > ioctl failed: Invalid argument
> > > > root [at] localhos# matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -o 1 2
> > > > ioctl failed: Invalid argument
> > > >
> > > > "matroxset -f /dev/fb0 -m 1", however, works fine.
> > >
> > > Try doing this before loading the marvel capture drivers/modules.
> > _______________________________________________
> > mythtv-dev mailing list
> > mythtv-dev [at] snowman
> > http://www.snowman.net/mailman/listinfo/mythtv-dev
> >
> >
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> mythtv-dev mailing list
> mythtv-dev [at] snowman
> http://www.snowman.net/mailman/listinfo/mythtv-dev


nathan at ziarek

Jan 8, 2003, 4:15 PM

Post #13 of 21 (17514 views)
Permalink
RE: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

I would consider myself an above average Windows user, although my guess
is quite a bit below where you'd be.

MythTV is my first experience with Linux, and the documents are
absolutely great. Kind of like Nathan Langley said, I would go with
Mandrake 9 to begin with (a few quirks, but setting up ALSA is way
easier and without it, I couldn't get Myth to run on RedHat). Now that I
feel like I know something, I am thinking about going over to Gentoo,
since it is supposed to be faster.

Anyway, as a fellow newbie, I would stick with the more commercial
distros (RedHat or Mandrake, my suggestion Mandrake) and follow the
documents. They are really very good...

Nate


bjohnson+sender+e33745 at symetrix

Jan 8, 2003, 4:49 PM

Post #14 of 21 (17573 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

If you decide on Redhat 8, you can use the RPMS that you pointed out before.
Anything that was lacking from RH8, I've packaged into RPMS.

First install RH8, then run up2date to make sure you get all the current
redhat versions (you'll need to install a development environment to build
mythTV as well - so keep that in mind when selecting packages)

Then, install the RPMS I've built:
http://www.symetrix.com/files/mythtv
namely:
expat, expat-devel
perl-XML-Twig, perl-XML-Writer, xmltv
kernel (if needed)
mgavideo (if needed - not to be too trusted yet)
other rpms (ie. lame) can be grabbed from http://www.freshrpms.net

(I'm in the process of copying the kernel and mgavideo rpms to web space, so
they may not appear immediately)

you will also have to use the cvs version of mythtv or wait for 0.8 since
the mjpeg support is not built in yet. I haven't packaged mythtv yet
because I haven't gotten it working reliably yet.

Just so you know what you're getting into.... The kernel that I have built
only provides framebuffer support, so you can, for example, mirror your X11
desktop that is on your monitor to your TV.

In order to capture/playback using mjpeg, you'll also have to install the
mgavideo support (get rpm or build yourself http://marvel.sourceforge.net).
There seems to be conflicts in the built in framebuffer support in the
kernel and the mgavideo drivers. When I load the modules for mgavideo, it
kills my tvout of the desktop. As I understand it now, the goals of the
guys that write the framebuffer code for the kernel and the goal of the
mgavideo team are not the same and they are stepping on each other
code-wise.

If you are not using tv-out, this should not be an issue.


maillists at sonictech

Jan 8, 2003, 5:25 PM

Post #15 of 21 (17548 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

On Wed, Jan 08, 2003 at 05:48:15PM -0500, John wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> Well, I've just ordered myself a G200 (16mb AGP) and am ready to take the
> MythTV plunge! It will be a dedicated MythTV system. I have read the G200
> How-To (several times) and the additions to it. Here's the problem...
>
> I'm a very experienced s/w developer, but it's all in Windows (and DOS
> device drivers if that counts for anything ;-). I have a boxed copy of SuSE
> 8.0 Personal here next to me and a PIII-800, 512mb RAM, 80gb ready to use.
> The problem is that I don't know what the best version of Linux is for my
> G200 setup? Isaac uses Debian Unstable, Ray (below) has a RH 8 RPM
> but that's just the kernels (not sure how close that gets me?), and other
> threads say Gentoo is fastest.

Actually I'm using Debian Woody (stable). That's a version of a
distribution just like Red Hat 8 or Suse 7.1 etc. Installing a newer or
different kernel should be pretty easy with any current distro. Myth (and
the G200) should work pretty equally on any Distro although you'll probably
get more effective help if you use what others here are using. I havn't
tried Gentoo yet but I'd expect this is the sort of app that would get some
benifit from it.

> Ideally, I'd download an ISO image, burn
> it, and install the new system from that, but I know that's asking waaaay
> to much. So, what's the simplest way to get this new system
> up-and-running? I've only installed Linux twice and both times from
> "pre-packaged" installs. HD formats and cmd lines don't scare me. Docs
> that "assume" a lot do. ;-)

Probably the easiest distro to install (of the ones I've tried) is Mandrake
and there are at least a few Myth users on Mandrake but I don't know
anything about dealing with hardware setup problems there. Debian is a lot
more "manual" than Mandrake, RH or SuSe but I actually prefer that but it's
not the easiest Linux to start with. One other nice thing about Debian is
that a lot of developers and documentation writers seem to use it. When I
first started with Linux I used Slackware, in part because most of the docs
I'd read were written by Slackware users.

> If I downloaded the Debian image Isaac points us to and installed it, it
> wouldn't have the support for the G200 built-in right? Is it an easy add
> then or do you almost start over to add that?

Neither :) Once you install Debian (or any other distro) then you make sure
the audio and video seem to be working fairly well and your hard disk is
using dma mode. Then you start following the instructions in the howto. I
don't think there are any pre made debs for the cvs version of Myth so using
Debian won't be an advantage in that respect unless you wait for 0.8.

>
> I'm willing to learn and contribute code (lots of C++ experience). Would I
> be best off going for the CVS setup?

Probably you'd be best off getting whatever distro you want (maybe you like
one of the ones you've tried allready or maybe you have a local friend who
uses Linux?) installed and spend the next few weeks learning all you can
about Linux. You might as well get the Marvel drivers and and mjpeg tools
installed and working well on their own. Then when Myth 0.8 comes out you
should be ready for it.

--
Ray


rac at racarris

Jan 8, 2003, 7:01 PM

Post #16 of 21 (17539 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

I'm in the same boat John. I'm very experainced w/ Windows, and have
tinkered with FreeBSD for many years, but new to Linux just to get Myth
working. I tried Debian last week, because of the packages. But, it is
pretty difficult to install and configure compared to the other distros
out there - Wow. Much worse than I ever expected. IMHO, worse then
FreeBSD, but that is another holy war.

Therefore, I looked at RedHat, Susie, and Mandrake. Susie was out,
because although i've heard great things about it, Myth's documentation
has no mention of it. Mandrake won once I saw that the webpage said
the final step of the install was to configure the Tv Card - which did
work out of the box.

I installed Mandrake Monday night - no problems whatsoever. Worked on
Myth for the past two days, and with the documentation, reading every
post to the mailinglist three time, and a lot of patients, I got it
working (sort-of, several kinks to work out).

Mandrake 9.0 is very slick. It has some quirks and things that I don't
like (like booting directly into KDE w/o login). But it is slick and
easy to install- definately makes distro choice the least of your
concerns. But, bottom line is that you should really install what ever
distro you can get the most help on. If you have no local friends, then
I would really recommend Mandrake. Its easy to install and if you can't
get Mandrake help, usually the RedHat help works because they are so
similar.

RAC

John wrote:

>Hi all,
>
>Well, I've just ordered myself a G200 (16mb AGP) and am ready to take the
>MythTV plunge! It will be a dedicated MythTV system. I have read the G200
>How-To (several times) and the additions to it. Here's the problem...
>
>I'm a very experienced s/w developer, but it's all in Windows (and DOS
>device drivers if that counts for anything ;-). I have a boxed copy of SuSE
>8.0 Personal here next to me and a PIII-800, 512mb RAM, 80gb ready to use.
>The problem is that I don't know what the best version of Linux is for my
>G200 setup? Isaac uses Debian Unstable, Ray (below) has a RH 8 RPM but
>that's just the kernels (not sure how close that gets me?), and other
>threads say Gentoo is fastest. Ideally, I'd download an ISO image, burn it,
>and install the new system from that, but I know that's asking waaaay to
>much. So, what's the simplest way to get this new system up-and-running?
>I've only installed Linux twice and both times from "pre-packaged" installs.
>HD formats and cmd lines don't scare me. Docs that "assume" a lot do. ;-)
>
>If I downloaded the Debian image Isaac points us to and installed it, it
>wouldn't have the support for the G200 built-in right? Is it an easy add
>then or do you almost start over to add that?
>
>I'm willing to learn and contribute code (lots of C++ experience). Would I
>be best off going for the CVS setup?
>
>Thanks VERY much!
>John
>
>


pschuh at Stanford

Jan 13, 2003, 1:54 PM

Post #17 of 21 (17527 views)
Permalink
Re:Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

I've had some problems getting my G200 to work with MythTV. What drivers
are people using here (that have a G200 working with myth) for v4l?
What version of Xawtv are people using?

I went through the procedure on linux.zsolt.net/marvel.html and it didn't
work very well (video jumps and stutters when using hardware encoding and
some modules have trouble compiling). There are 2 patches listed on that
site--one for the mga v4l driver and one for xawtv. Are people here using
patched versions of the source?

If anyone knows the procedure that they went through, I'd really
appreciate a run-through.

Thanks,

Peter


johnmythtv at crombe

Jan 18, 2003, 11:10 AM

Post #18 of 21 (17614 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

Hi All,

Setting up my first MythTV system and I have a problem! Maybe someone can
help?

Following all the steps works perfectly up to the point where I run
./setup. It says it's unable to find the video device. I'm using Mandrake
9.0 and when I go into the Mandrake Control Center / Hardware and click on
TV Cards, it says No TV Card has been detected. I guess that makes sense.
It autodetects my Matrox G200-TV as a video card but not a TV Tuner card.

Ok, so I'm trying to follow the instructions below, but they're built for
someone building their kernel from scratch I think, and I'm not sure how to
do that.

I've followed the flashing the new BIOS part and setting the TV out default,
and when I boot I see it on the monitor and TV output just fine. It's the
part below that's got me completely confused:

> Step 2: Build an appropriate kernel
>
> Step 2.1: I built the following into the kernel (not built as modules):
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C support
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C bit-banging interfaces
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C device interface
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C /proc interface
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox acceleration
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G100/G200/ ...
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox I2C support
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G400 second head support
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox /proc interface
>
> NOTE: you need the G400 second head support even if you have a G200. It
> builds the driver for the MAVEN chip, which actually does the TV-out
> conversion.
>
> Step 2.2: make dep, make bzImage, make modules, make modules_install. Copy
> bzImage to the boot wherever and lilo it.

How do I do that? I googled for I2C and found a package and untarred it but
then I pretty much am stuck. The instructions above are for a Linux guru
who knows what all to do to do those steps. I'm lost! Please point me in
the right direction. Do I already have some of those options done w/my
Mandrake 9.0 setup? I need instructions more along the lines of the great
MythTV docs which tell you how to do each step vs. these "overview"
instructions.

Thanks!!
John



----- Original Message -----
From: "Colin Panisset" <mythtv [at] clabber>
To: <mythtv-dev [at] snowman>
Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2002 7:17 PM
Subject: [mythtv] Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO!


> Since I've just spent a hair-pulling time getting this lot going, I
figured
> I'd share the joy and perhaps help others work out how to get this beast
> set up. Perhaps it'll even be useful for those using a G400 with TV-out on
> the second head.
>
> This is kinda long...
>
> WARNINGS:
> ** keep a rescue floppy/CD!
> ** don't blame me if you fry your hardware/TV/monitor trying this.
Tweaking
> video card settings at the register level can cause signals which may
drive
> display hardware beyond their design specs. You can kill hardware like
> this.
> ** no warranty expressed or implied, contents under pressure, not suitable
> for children, not a floatation device, sell-by date on bottom of package.
>
> So, here we go:
>
> Step 1: Upgrade the G200 BIOS
>
> Step 1.1: Download the latest BIOS for the card from
> http://www.matrox.com/mga/support/drivers/bios/home2.cfm
>
> Step 1.2: You'll need to use DOS to flash the BIOS -- I used the FreeDOS
> install floppy (available from
>
http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/micro/pc-stuff/freedos/files/distributions/beta8/
instdisk/1.44/)
> as a temporary boot disk. dd the image to a floppy, then mount it. Delete
> most of the contents, except for the command.com and kernel.sys. Copy in
> all the .bin files from the bios .ZIP, plus ubiosdos.exe, dos4gw.exe,
> english.mmf, and progbios.exe.
> Leave the disk writeable.
>
> Step 1.3: boot the machine from the FreeDOS floppy, and execute:
>
> ubiosdos
>
> I didn't make a backup disk, just pressed enter and let it flash
> (note: if things screw up, this could be your undoing)
>
> Step 1.4: force the G200 BIOS to turn on the TV out at boot time:
>
> progbios -maven ntsc (use pal for PAL, and off for, um, off)
>
> Step 1.5: reboot. At this point, I already had my TV connected to the
> external breakout box, and was delighted to see the Award BIOS boot
> messages. I was able to alter PC BIOS settings, and all. This could be
> important... :)
>
> Step 2: Build an appropriate kernel
>
> Step 2.1: I built the following into the kernel (not built as modules):
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C support
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C bit-banging interfaces
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C device interface
> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C /proc interface
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox acceleration
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G100/G200/ ...
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox I2C support
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G400 second head support
> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox /proc interface
>
> NOTE: you need the G400 second head support even if you have a G200. It
> builds the driver for the MAVEN chip, which actually does the TV-out
> conversion.
>
> Step 2.2: make dep, make bzImage, make modules, make modules_install. Copy
> bzImage to the boot wherever and lilo it. Read
> /usr/src/linux/Documentation/fb/matroxfb.txt for options you can pass to
> the Matrox framebuffer driver through lilo
>
> You could boot the new kernel at this point if you liked, but make sure
> you've kept your monitor attached to the PC, because the MGA console
driver
> switches to a VESA mode that my TV couldn't display.
>
> Step 3: Set up XFree86
>
> Step 3.1: In your /etc/X11/XF86Config-4, put something like this:
>
> ---- Begin snippet ----
>
> Section "Monitor"
> Identifier "TV"
> VendorName "Unknown"
> ModelName "Unknown"
> HorizSync 31-50
> VertRefresh 60 # This is for NTSC. PAL should use 50
> EndSection
>
> Section "Device"
> Identifier "My Video Card"
> Driver "mga"
> BoardName "Unknown"
> Option "UseFBDev" "on"
> Option "HWCursor" "off"
> EndSection
>
> Section "Device"
> Identifier "Linux Frame Buffer"
> Driver "fbdev"
> BoardName "Unknown"
> EndSection
>
> Section "Screen"
> Identifier "Screen0"
> Device "My Video Card"
> Monitor "TV"
> DefaultDepth 16
> Subsection "Display"
> Depth 16
> Modes "800x600"
> EndSubSection
> EndSection
>
> ---- End snippet ----
>
> Step 3.2: restart X (ctrl-alt-backspace) to make sure it's using the fb
> device. Check /var/log/XFree86.0.log to make sure.
>
> Step 3.3: Get matroxset from the MPlayer distribution
> (http://www.mplayerhq.hu/homepage/), build and install it (it's in the
> TVout subdirectory of the source). Also build and install fbset from the
> same distribution.
>
> Get maven-prog from http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/matroxfb.html -- build
> it (it'll end up being called "matrox", but you can rename it) and install
> it.
>
> Step 3.4: Mirror the framebuffer onto the TV out with matroxset:
>
> matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # use -m 1 for monitor-only, -m 2 for TV only
> matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set output 1 to NTSC. Use -o 1 1 for PAL
>
> Step 3.5: Tweak the display
>
> This is where you may end up typing blind. See
> http://davedina.apestaart.org/download/doc/Matrox-TVOUT-HOWTO-0.1.txt for
a
> great explanation
>
> When you have the size and location of the screen set to your liking, use
> "maven-prog" (or "matrox", if you didn't rename it) from above to set the
> black level, white level, saturation, hue, antialiasing, and whatnot. My
> settings are:
>
> matrox 0x0e 0x3f # sets the black level
> matrox 0x1e 0xcf # sets the white level
> matrox 0x22 0x76 # sets the hue
>
> See http://platan.vc.cvut.cz/~vana/maven/mavenreg.html for a description
of
> the MAVEN chip registers.
>
> I put the resulting fbset and matrox commands in my mythtv user's
> .xsession.
>
> Step 3.6: To put the text console back on the TV after the boot process
> turns it off, I put the following lines in /etc/rc.sysinit, right after
> devfsd is launched:
>
> /sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -m 3 # both monitor and TV
> /sbin/matroxset -f /dev/fb/0 -o 1 2 # set TV to NTSC
>
> Step 4: Beer (or tea, coffee, wine, spring water, or whatever)
>
> That's it. I only wish it had been as quick and easy to figure out as it
was
> to type this up :)
>
> Notes:
> ** if you built ALSA drivers for a previous kernel, you'll probably have
to
> build and install them again.
> ** The G200 (and, presumably, the G400) will display up to 1024x768
through
> the miracle of scan conversion, but 800x600 works well for MythTV for me.
> ** don't be concerned if it seems like X is taking a long time to start up
> in a mode that the TV can sync to. My TV also flashes like crazy for about
> 5 seconds while this is going on. Eventually, it gets there.
> ** My Shuttle SV24 locks up sometimes with this card. It's reproducible,
so
> must be a driver problem. It happens when running "make xconfig" from the
> linux kernel tree, and sometimes when dragging the scrollbar up or down in
> Mozilla. Turning off various acceleration features may resolve this, but I
> haven't tried that yet.
> ** I have run mplayer with the normal Xvideo output in this mode, and it's
> just fine. You could also build it with the mga driver and have it use the
> hardware acceleration, but I haven't got there yet.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> mythtv-dev mailing list
> mythtv-dev [at] snowman
> http://www.snowman.net/mailman/listinfo/mythtv-dev
>
>


maillists at sonictech

Jan 18, 2003, 11:21 AM

Post #19 of 21 (17509 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

On Sat, Jan 18, 2003 at 01:10:26PM -0500, John wrote:
>
> Ok, so I'm trying to follow the instructions below, but they're built for
> someone building their kernel from scratch I think, and I'm not sure how to
> do that.

Chances are Mandrake ships with some instructions for compiling a custom
kernel in Mandrake so you might want to start there. The short and not at
all detailed summary of what you'll do is:

1. Download or install from your Mandrake Cd the kernel source.
2. Run one of the kernel config tools and use it to select what features you
want compiled into the kernel.
3. Compile the kernel
4. Install your newly compiled kernel.

It's a bit of a pain the first time because there are so many options to
choose from and you'll probably go through the above several times before
you get it right but later on adding additional features is easy.

--
Ray


mythtv at matter

Jan 18, 2003, 11:29 AM

Post #20 of 21 (17509 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

> Ok, so I'm trying to follow the instructions below, but they're built
> for someone building their kernel from scratch I think, and I'm not sure
> how to do that.

Look at /usr/src/linux/README - this tells you how to recompile the
kernel. It's not that difficult, but it can be intimidating.

>> Step 2.1: I built the following into the kernel (not built as
>> modules): Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C support
>> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C bit-banging interfaces
>> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C device interface
>> Character devices -> I2C support -> I2C /proc interface
>> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox acceleration
>> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G100/G200/ ...
>> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox I2C support
>> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> G400 second head support
>> Console drivers -> Frame-buffer support -> Matrox /proc interface

One of the steps to compiling the kernel is the config step (see the
README under "make config"). These will make sense after you read that
and run one of the config options. Take note of the "not as modules" part
of these instructions.

>> Step 2.2: make dep, make bzImage, make modules, make modules_install.
>> Copy bzImage to the boot wherever and lilo it.

The make steps are also detailed in the README. You will fine bzImage in
/usr/src/linux/arch/i386/boot. You need to copy it to /boot. Then you
need to edit /etc/lilo.conf and after that run "lilo". Be careful that
you "add" an entry for your new kernel and keep an entry for the old one
so that you can boot back into that if the new one doesn't work.

Keep a rescue disk handy :-)

Larry


maillists at sonictech

Jan 18, 2003, 2:37 PM

Post #21 of 21 (17510 views)
Permalink
Re: Matrox G200 TV out works! HOWTO! [In reply to]

On Sat, Jan 18, 2003 at 10:29:33AM -0800, Larry Matter wrote:
>
> One of the steps to compiling the kernel is the config step (see the
> README under "make config"). These will make sense after you read that
> and run one of the config options. Take note of the "not as modules" part
> of these instructions.

FWIW I did compile just about everything as modules and it works fine that
way as well.

--
Ray

MythTV dev RSS feed   Index | Next | Previous | View Threaded
 
 


Interested in having your list archived? Contact Gossamer Threads
 
  Web Applications & Managed Hosting Powered by Gossamer Threads Inc.