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How do I switch to a window manager?

 

 

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herber at thing

Jun 17, 2009, 9:39 AM

Post #1 of 4 (1264 views)
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How do I switch to a window manager?

Can somebody answer a question, related to the favorite WM question, how
do I change to an alternative window manager?

I normally run xdm and update my .xinitrc or .xsession file to do this
but I feel that there should be a better way. How do you do it?

Thanks,

--
Steve Herber herber [at] thing work: 206-221-7262
Software Engineer, UW Medicine, IT Services home: 425-454-2399


rsanders at sgi

Jun 17, 2009, 9:40 AM

Post #2 of 4 (1186 views)
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Re: How do I switch to a window manager? [In reply to]

Steve Herber, mused, then expounded:
> Can somebody answer a question, related to the favorite WM question, how
> do I change to an alternative window manager?
>

Edit /etc/rc.conf and /etc/conf.d/xdm

Bob
-


markknecht at gmail

Jun 17, 2009, 9:51 AM

Post #3 of 4 (1187 views)
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Re: How do I switch to a window manager? [In reply to]

On Wed, Jun 17, 2009 at 9:39 AM, Steve Herber<herber [at] thing> wrote:
> Can somebody answer a question, related to the favorite WM question, how
> do I change to an alternative window manager?
>
> I normally run xdm and update my .xinitrc or .xsession file to do this
> but I feel that there should be a better way.  How do you do it?
>
> Thanks,
>
> --
> Steve Herber    herber [at] thing                work: 206-221-7262
> Software Engineer, UW Medicine, IT Services     home: 425-454-2399
>
>
>

I use gdm as a log in manager. On the bottom of the login screen there
is a pull down that allows me to choose which one I want to run and
whether to make it default or to only use it for this session.

Hope this helps,
Mark


1i5t5.duncan at cox

Jun 17, 2009, 11:51 AM

Post #4 of 4 (1186 views)
Permalink
Re: How do I switch to a window manager? [In reply to]

Steve Herber <herber [at] thing> posted
Pine.LNX.4.64.0906170910450.29525 [at] thing, excerpted below, on Wed, 17
Jun 2009 09:39:13 -0700:

> Can somebody answer a question, related to the favorite WM question, how
> do I change to an alternative window manager?
>
> I normally run xdm and update my .xinitrc or .xsession file to do this
> but I feel that there should be a better way. How do you do it?

My "better way" is to not use a graphical login manager at all, but
rather to login at the text login prompt, and start X (and my WM/DE
(windo manager / desktop environment) of choice) from there. Whether
that's a "better way" for you or not, of course depends on you, but it
Works for Me (tm)!

The various DEs and at least some of the WMs should put session scripts
in /etc/X11/Sessions, with launchers (like startkde) in the path. You
can either use the launchers, or create your own.

I create my own launchers as scriptlets that make use of the generic
startx. Normally, startx depends on the XSESSION variable as set and
exported in either the system scripts (rc.conf, IIRC for baselayout-1
users) or in a user's startup scripts (.bashrc or the like). However,
that's kind of limiting since it leaves just one choice. So for each
session script in /etc/X11/Sessions, I create a scriptlet, say k4 for
kde4, k3 for kde3, g2 if I had gnome2 installed, etc. Each of these sets
and exports the XSESSION variable to match the appropriate filename in
the Sessions dir, and then invokes startx. Now, with a single short (two-
character in the above examples, g2, k3, k4, etc) command, I can start
any of the session types I want. =:^)

What's nice about this is that once the launcher scriptlets are setup,
it's possible to take care of any other housekeeping as necessary,
setting up any other environmental vars, whatever. Any commands before
the startx will run as X and that environment starts. Any after it will
run as it quits back to the text login. Or, make it startx &, so it runs
in the background and issue the bash disown command, and the script will
startx in the background and then terminate, leaving you with a bash
prompt again. Then you can do what I do and run ". k3", so it runs it in
the current shell, and it'll logout after startx as well, thus returning
that VT to the login prompt.

As can be seen, it wasn't for nothing that I said my system is rather
more uniquely customized than most. =:^) But it fits the way I work and
is thus the "better way" for me, which is what counts. And of course
Gentoo makes all that customization far easier than most distributions
do, making it all the better! =:^)

--
Duncan - List replies preferred. No HTML msgs.
"Every nonfree program has a lord, a master --
and if you use the program, he is your master." Richard Stallman

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