Login | Register For Free | Help
Search for: (Advanced)

Mailing List Archive: Cisco: NSP

Difference between Partial Route Computation and iSPF

 

 

Cisco nsp RSS feed   Index | Next | Previous | View Threaded


narain.arun at gmail

Apr 25, 2012, 8:26 PM

Post #1 of 2 (708 views)
Permalink
Difference between Partial Route Computation and iSPF

Hi,

I would like to know is there any functional difference between PRC and
iSPF as far as both OSPF and IS-IS is concerned. I know IS-IS had PRC
feature inherent to its protocol as it has separate TLV for NLRI and
topology information and OSPF was not. Introduction of iSPF made OSPF the
same functionality as PRC in IS-IS. But iSPF is introduced to IS-IS as
well. So

1. introducing iSPF to IS-IS would not make much difference as it already
had PRC?
2. any functional difference between iSPF and PRC?
3. PRC is jargon which is enabled by default or not be enabled or disabled
like iSPF?

thanks in advance
Arun
_______________________________________________
cisco-nsp mailing list cisco-nsp [at] puck
https://puck.nether.net/mailman/listinfo/cisco-nsp
archive at http://puck.nether.net/pipermail/cisco-nsp/


mark.tinka at seacom

May 10, 2012, 12:28 PM

Post #2 of 2 (639 views)
Permalink
Re: Difference between Partial Route Computation and iSPF [In reply to]

On Thursday, April 26, 2012 05:26:50 AM Arun Kumar wrote:

> I would like to know is there any functional difference
> between PRC and iSPF as far as both OSPF and IS-IS is
> concerned. I know IS-IS had PRC feature inherent to its
> protocol as it has separate TLV for NLRI and topology
> information and OSPF was not. Introduction of iSPF made
> OSPF the same functionality as PRC in IS-IS. But iSPF is
> introduced to IS-IS as well. So
>
> 1. introducing iSPF to IS-IS would not make much
> difference as it already had PRC?
> 2. any functional difference between iSPF and PRC?
> 3. PRC is jargon which is enabled by default or not be
> enabled or disabled like iSPF?

iSPF deals specifically with topology changes, while PRC
deals with route changes (NLRI, to be specific).

As you mention, this distinction is clearer with IS-IS than
with OSPFv2, due to the TLV structure. It is also clearer
with OSPFv3, as like IS-IS, OSPFv3 is based on the TLV
structure.

iSPF is useful when it isn't necessary to run an entire SPF
calculation against a change in the topology, e.g., when
only one router is being added to or removed from the
network. In this case, the full SPF run isn't necessary.

On the otherhand, PRC deals with NLRI changes, e.g., change
or deletion of a metric assigned to an IP prefix. While IS-
IS and OSPF (both versions) record attributes associated
with a route, the actual routes, themselves, have no bearing
on an SPF calculation. Once an SPT has been identified, all
that remains is to record what prefixes are attached to
routers on that SPT. So if the prefix NLRI changes (but the
topology remains the same), the neighboring routers on the
SPT do not need to re-calculate the SPF; only the changes to
the NLRI.

But as you rightly mention, PRC needs to be understood for
OSPFv2 and IS-IS/OSPFv3, separately. IS-IS and OSPFv3
separate topology from routing information. So the effects
of PRC are immediate and obvious. However, OSPFv2 carriers
prefix information in Type 1 and Type 2 LSA's. So a change
in the NLRI also triggers an update in the topology
information, even though the topology hasn't changed,
meaning a full SPF is run within an OSPF area even if only
NLRI has changed.

In OSPFv2, only Type 3, 4, 5 and 7 LSA's trigger true PRC,
as their only purpose in life is to signal prefix
information (due to belonging to external areas). Remember,
the whole purpose of areas is to restrict topology updates
to routers belonging to the same area, so Type 1 and Type 2
LSA's have no business propagating to another area, hence
the innate PRC capability of OSPFv2 when exchanging routes
between areas.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Mark.
_______________________________________________
cisco-nsp mailing list cisco-nsp [at] puck
https://puck.nether.net/mailman/listinfo/cisco-nsp
archive at http://puck.nether.net/pipermail/cisco-nsp/

Cisco nsp RSS feed   Index | Next | Previous | View Threaded
 
 


Interested in having your list archived? Contact Gossamer Threads
 
  Web Applications & Managed Hosting Powered by Gossamer Threads Inc.